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Alpha_ProgDes

Random question about graphics.

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As of right now, I'm thinking on the lowest common denominator (the Wii). But it seems like you can have more going on the screen and at the same time have the player being more immersive, if you have make the models smaller and with less detail. A highly detailed and immersive game is MGS4 or Gears of War, IMO. But why can't I have a world where the camera isn't focused on my on the detail of my armor but rather gives me a wider view on the environment and how I interact with it? Basically sacrificing graphics prowess for physics prowess. If a Lego Star Wars can beat out the majority of Star Wars game that came before it, then how come this trend isn't becoming prevalent? I'm done rambling. Thank you for reading.

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I agree.

As for why it's not more prevalent, I'd say that's because epic, close-up titles focusing on individuals form the majority of the AAA marketing push right now.

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It is. There's a re-emergence of games that are more cartoony to emphasize fun:

Team Fortress 2 (http://orange.half-life2.com/tf2.html)
The new Battlefield ( http://www.battlefield-heroes.com/
Portal (http://orange.half-life2.com/portal.html
Lego Indiana Jones ( http://indianajones.lego.com/en-US/default.aspx

However, just because more cartoony games are showing up doesn't mean there isn't still a strong market for realistic graphics games:

The new MGS will sell lots of units
Asassin's Creed sold lots of units (~6 million)
The Rainbow 6 series sells tons of units
etc

-me

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The Grand Theft Auto III+ series has always leaned in that direction. They look pretty good, but they could have looked a lot better if they sacrificed other game aspects, like car physics, civilians, traffic, and few loading screens. They emphasized what actually matters to the game, and they sold extremely well regardless.

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Well, I think its because games focusing on graphics usually draw in more of a crowd, the first waves of sales and attention by its first impression ("holy moly that game looks good I'm going to get it!") while games focusing on physics prowess tend to keep gamers on the game while making less of a first impression.

If a game that isn't too graphical and is instead focusing more on physics needs to make a better first impression, I would say that it needs to present what it focused on - make movie ads where lots of action is taking place involving the many models that it can support. If you have kickin' explosions physics then show lots of things blowing up. If a game is more animated than graphical, then animation is what it should try to sell.

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Agreed. I don't play games for realism but to escape from reality. I'm working on a game project at the moment and have been researching different cartoon styles so that I can get an immersive, yet surreal, environment with only simple graphics. The purpose of this is, as mentioned, to fit more interaction/immersion into the game (I also don't want to spend years building detailed content).

The OP actually brought to mind a difference I noticed between Doom 3 and the original doom. The original had no real story throughout and, therefore, didn't need any explanation for it's level design. Walking into a room and finding that it's shaped like a pentagram didn't make much sense but it also created a sense of wonder and mystery. I always had the sense of being part of something profound. Doom 3, on the other hand, just had me shitting my pants every 30 seconds. Nothing was really left to the imagination and seemed to lose the immersive qualities of the original. Greatly enhanced detail may have added much to the game but also took something away, IMO.

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