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realworld666

Mini golf physics

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Just looking for a second opinion on some maths/physics to do with a little mini golf game I'm putting together. Its very basic and so a few approximations at the expense of accuracy should be fine. The ball can physically leave the ground at times when the ball hits ramps etc. Bearing this in mind is there a one equation fits all approach that would handle ball movement across the ground and through the air or would I need to seperate the two. When you're handling a ball moving across the surface of the ground its colliding all the time, sometimes at an incline but when its airbourne then the collision with the ground becomes a simple reflection test. Any tips or pointers to papers would be appreciated :)

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The ball can physically leave the ground at times when the ball hits ramps etc. Bearing this in mind is there a one equation fits all approach that would handle ball movement across the ground and through the air or would I need to seperate the two.
Separating the two would give you the highest possible fidelity.

I remember a good article on the physics of pool from Gamasutra a few years ago. It might be worth looking for... much of it would carry over.

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There are free full fledge physics engines which will suit your needs. Look into Newton, it's been used on a commercial billards game and the simulation is very accurate. However if your gameplay involves alot of "cartoon" physics ie. ball going against gravity, floating in arbitary arcs and paths, then it's better to roll your own implementation then.

-ddn

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Original post by ddn3
There are free full fledge physics engines which will suit your needs. Look into Newton, it's been used on a commercial billards game and the simulation is very accurate. However if your gameplay involves alot of "cartoon" physics ie. ball going against gravity, floating in arbitary arcs and paths, then it's better to roll your own implementation then.

-ddn


Thats not really an option in this case unfortunately. I only need a few functions not a full physics engine.

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Original post by Sneftel
Quote:
The ball can physically leave the ground at times when the ball hits ramps etc. Bearing this in mind is there a one equation fits all approach that would handle ball movement across the ground and through the air or would I need to seperate the two.
Separating the two would give you the highest possible fidelity.

I remember a good article on the physics of pool from Gamasutra a few years ago. It might be worth looking for... much of it would carry over.


The Jeff Lander article I assume. Its interesting but makes a lot of assumptions such as the playing surface is flat where in mini golf its not. Its a good jumping off point though.

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I was imaginging more of a full 3d mini-golf game complete with a wooden Abe Linchion fighting with T-Rex who burst into flames when he loses. :D Now that would be cool.

-ddn

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Original post by ddn3
I was imaginging more of a full 3d mini-golf game complete with a wooden Abe Linchion fighting with T-Rex who burst into flames when he loses. :D Now that would be cool.

-ddn


That would be cool. Maybe for the sequel...

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the basis of a minigold imo would be swept sphere collisions vs polygons, simple slide / reflect velocity for collision response (and some friction). The sphere collision part is probably the trickiest, the physics should be easy enough.

If you want some better dynamics, add some rigid body dynamics to introduct spins effects and better friction. That enters monkey ball territory, but it's not too bad either (i.e. you wont need a PhD in mechanics).

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