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steveworks

writing actual code?

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In all the tutorials and books on programming in c++ i have never come across a reference as to how you actually write your own code. They teach the syntax and the meathods but they never actually go over how to write programms efficiantly. (spelling?) I have heard that code 2 complete is a very good book but i cant seem to find what exactly it covers. can anyone help me? yes I know that im too lazy to use a spellchecker.(:

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What do you mean exactly? That they don't teach you how to design your program? Or that they don't teach you how to create an effective work flow?

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Code Complete discusses program construction. Most of it involves process; requirements gathering, architecture, design, planning, testing, maintaining... It also covers tidbits of code creation that are good guidelines to make the code more usable.

It does not really discuss the ins and outs of writing a solution. I'm not really sure where you pick that up. I learned in classes, and then through practice. Most books like Design Patterns deal with higher level problems than I think you're asking about.

There are a few tidbits of advice that could help, but practice will always help.

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Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
There are a few tidbits of advice that could help, but practice will always help.


QFT.

Also, you may want to try out lots of different tools (editors, build systems, IDEs, debuggers...). Having a good knowledge of lots of tools will allow you to use tools that are well-suited to a particular task. They say that "when the only tool you have is a hammer, all of your problems start to look like nails".

Also, I'd definitely recommend learning a language that is good for shell-scripting, like Python. This will allow you to automate any tasks that you find particularly tedious.

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