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So i've been out of the C++ circles for a while now, working with python and on smaller projects only to come back to gamedev today to discover a main page article on 'D' At first I thought it was some clever joke, only to discover D has snuck up on me from no where, whats the scoop, what kind of coverage are we talking about? Is D the next big thing? Do we see an industry shift anytime soon? Or is this just another Superjava xPHP MaxTML on Rails? Getting back into c++ should I start D instead?

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I always saw D as a C++-like alternative really. The 'next big thing' from C++ was supposed to be C# I think.

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Nope, no industry shift -- not the next big thing -- D is just another programming language. I have nothing against it, but it doesn't have and almost certainly won't gain widespread adoption. The next "big thing", so to speak, is C++0x. There are a lot of changes and improvements coming to the language that you can read volumes about. In particular, a lot of useful Boost type stuff will be folded into the main language, and truly new language features will be added (like concepts). These types of things are likely worth learning.

--Rob

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I love D.

Not because of any merits it may or may not have as a programming language, or anything like that. No, I love D because it has an alarming tendency to create these kinds of threads.

D has been around for a while, and people have been wondering (or claiming) if it's going to be the 'C++ killer' just as long.

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Just because D follows C in the alphabet doesn't mean that D will deprecate C++. Languages don't kill each other.

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Quote:
Original post by jpetrie
I love D.

Not because of any merits it may or may not have as a programming language, or anything like that. No, I love D because it has an alarming tendency to create these kinds of threads.

D has been around for a while, and people have been wondering (or claiming) if it's going to be the 'C++ killer' just as long.


True, that. I've looked into D a little and it doesn't sound bad at all. Which makes me wondering -- why people only start forum threads about D, but there is no "real" work done in D? Like in Python, for instance. (Or is there? I haven't heard anything about D apart from that it exists.)

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Languages don't matter. Brainfuck could be the next mainstream language.

Future is determined simply by cost-benefit.

Compared to C/C++ baseline:
- Java: high memory demand, slower by a constant factor
- Python: slow
- C#: slower by a constant factor
- AJAX, javascript: slow, security nightmare, network inefficient

Yet few businesses will try to use C/C++ for same type of work.

What do new languages provide:
- Java: truly portable, truly safe (it really is, even if it borked its own object model at this expense)
- Python: OO as flexible and useful as it gets. Shares some spirit with Perl. Popular in academia
- C#: .Net framework, which gives you anything and everything Microsoft has ever written. This in itself is enough, even discarding everything else
- AJAX/javascript - simple enough for script kiddie to integrate and modify without exploding horribly, yet powerful enough for Google.

Legacy code is not a factor. While huge C/C++ libraries do persist till today, if a viable alternative appeared, they'd simply be re-coded, or be redundant.

As for comparison to C++, with its current Microsoft support, it isn't going anywhere.

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D does not fix enough of what's wrong with C++ to make me interested in it. That it's not nearly as developed as other alternatives makes me largely disinterested.

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Quote:
Original post by Antheus
Languages don't matter.

This just wrong in so many ways. What counts is productivity and the language is a huge factor in that, along with availability of libraries and tools.

Quote:

Compared to C/C++ baseline:
...

Performance comparison like this is pointless, since you can't attribute performance to the language itself. And you're wrong about it too: Java and C# can be faster than C or C++ in some cases. Python and javascript don't compare to C/C++, because they fit different niches. I could easily list pros and cons of many other aspects of these languages than raw performance; performance hasn't been the single most important deciding factor for most developers in years (if it ever was).

Quote:

- Java: truly portable, truly safe

This may be true for some definition of portability and safety, but I'd avoid such broad sweeping comments. Strangely you say that javascript isn't safe at all, even though the language itself is just as 'safe' as Java. Ironically, portability in it's niche is unparallelled by javascript, even though javascript compatibility issues are a constant nightmare for web developers.

Quote:

Legacy code is not a factor. While huge C/C++ libraries do persist till today, if a viable alternative appeared, they'd simply be re-coded, or be redundant.

Somehow I doubt this.

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D looks like an interesting language, but then Objective-C is an interesting language in the same way. I've always been surprised that people don't look on Objective-C in a more favourable light.

That article did perk my interest in D quite a bit though, I just wish I had a bit more time but alas I need to learn Python next for the two big 3D applications I use make use of it as a scripting language *sigh*.

Anyone have any examples of a project written in D (open source)?

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