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DigitalSeeker

FPS game

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Hi, I am new to the forums and was interested in advice about FPS game development. I was thinking on making a multiplayer fps based mainly only, limited on single player. It can be reflected on the soldier front game developed by ijji.com > sfront.ijji.com, although with a whole knew twist. After reading a few posts i have decided that making my own game engine is where to start. I wanted to know if anyone has any resources regarding fps game engine development and also making the 3d graphics for such a game. I know how to use maya and 3d max, but not really how to implement these in creating a game. Any advice or topic/book/articles links would be appreciated. I am still a beginner and a FPS seems easier to start out with than going for a MMORPG. Few things i want to know but don't -combining the code with the 3d graphics -specific way of making 3d graphics for the code -developing a game engine? How? -can the same FPS devoted engine be adapted for MMORPG usage? Thanks,

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I've created levels for shooters for 8+ years in my spare time and let me tell you, what you're looking for is a pretty complex job. I don't know exactly how far you plan to take your game - what visual quality and gameplay complexity you're aiming for - but if you take Soldier Front as your reference, then you'll probably be busy for the next 10 years. Sure, it's still easier than a MMORPG... ;)


I'm not saying it's impossible, but I'm saying that you'll need a more realistic mindset if you want to pull this off. First of all, I don't know what kind of programming experience you have, but starting out with an engine, especially when you don't have concrete requirements, isn't the smartest thing to do - not if you lack the experience to pull it off. There are some decent engines available anyway so that shouldn't be much of a problem: you can use one of them and focus on the gamecode. If you choose to mod an existing game, such as Unreal or Half-Life, then it's even easier: you can start modifying gamecode almost immediately and you get a solid set of tools almost for nothing.

That's actually what I would recommend: take a game and modify it. It's easier than building a game from scratch and you'll still learn a lot. You may feel that it's worthless because you're not doing everything yourself, but believe me, you don't want to do everything yourself. You want to get a game done and your time is limited, right? Spend it wisely. ;)

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Thanks for the information, "Hartelijk bedankt for the informatie".
I see where you are coming from, i understand what you mean. I will take your advice and start with some already made engines or maybe mod a game, but thanks for the information because me myself didn't know the how i would be able to do something like this. Guess i will have to start small, Thx.

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Quote:
Original post by DigitalSeeker
Thanks for the information, "Hartelijk bedankt for the informatie".
I see where you are coming from, i understand what you mean. I will take your advice and start with some already made engines or maybe mod a game, but thanks for the information because me myself didn't know the how i would be able to do something like this. Guess i will have to start small, Thx.

Di nada! Good luck with your endeavors. :)

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Just wanted to echo Captain P's advice. The old adage of having to crawl before you walk holds for your goals. Modding gives you valuable experience and insight in to how a modern game is constructed. That experience will save you a lot of time down the road.

My recommendation is also to start with something much simpler. An FPS is a complicated animal. Starting with a project of that size you're likely to be mired in the thousands of decisions one needs to make. A "simple" tetris, pac-man, or asteroids clone is a better place to start. Those games may not bare any resemblance to your ultimate goal, but all of the lessons you take away from that project will directly translate to any other game you make. The experience is irreplaceable.

I recommend checking out this article with regard to making engines and games.

edit: fixed broken link (sorry!)

[Edited by - godecho on June 17, 2008 7:44:19 AM]

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Yep, I'd have to agree with the others to start with an existing engine. I happen to be working on an FPS from the ground up right now (N64 era complexity), and even though I pretty much know exactly how I want to structure things, it's still slow going. Granted I haven't had much time to work on it except for weekends, but it's still been 3 weeks and so far all I have is a grid you can walk around on, a nice input manager, and some half done model loading and animation code.

Once you've completed a 3D game or two you should have a pretty good idea what sort of "engine" code is needed, and then you can write it yourself if you want to. But definitely follow the "games not engines" rule mentioned by godecho (although appearently his link didn't work, and I'm too lazy to go dig up the article :p )

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I've made video tutorials that I posted on my website showing how to create a FPS game engine. Right now I'm in the process of putting together tutorials showing how to use the game engine to make a full game.

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for an easier way out, go to fpscreator.com, buy the engine, and learn how to use its script. This is much simpler, and even a rookie like me can do it.

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I think modding an existing engine is still really difficult as it requires learning someone else's code.


Another way to create a fps, is to learn to use a physics engine and create a basic camera.

Then just attach the camera to a physical object (eg a cylinder) where you use the camera to look around and to move set the velocity of the object to move in the direction you are looking.

There are other parts to implement like levels and guns, but you will aleast be able to walk around.

To play around you can stack bricks to run into them or shoot them will balls etc.

PhysX is easy to learn but I prefer the more difficult 'Bullet' since it doesn't require you to install extra software.

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