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OpenGL wtf is opengl2 anyway?

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I can't find a straight answer --- in terms of code --- to how OpenGL 2 is different to any earlier version. I can only find prose about how common extensions have been made a part of the main API, mentions of GLSL etc... How would I recognise somebody else's code as being specifically OpenGL 2? Does anyone know of tutorials in how to program in OpenGL 2 given that the reader is already familiar with older OpenGL? Thanks

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Way back, the OpenGL 2.0 proposal was introduced by 3dfx in order to significantly revamp and redesign the API, to modernize it, etc. In other words, everything that OpenGL 3.0 is supposed to be doing now. Through the magical process of decision by committee, it was cut back until OpenGL 2.0 did nothing but integrate some extensions. Essentially, the final result should have been called 1.5 -- the change to 2.0 was just historical baggage.

Some people try to claim that the major version number change was jusitifed because GLSL was introduced and that was a big paradigm shift etc -- this is bs. 2.0 just integrates more extensions into the core, just like every previous version. You can distinguish GL 2.0+ code because the GLSL stuff (CreateProgram, AttachShader, etc) won't have an ARB extension.

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Quote:
Original post by Promit
Through the magical process of decision by committee, it was cut back until OpenGL 2.0 did nothing but integrate some extensions.

Given their staggering incompetence to actually release the GL3.0 spec, this was probably a good decision in hindsight. [rolleyes]

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Quote:
Original post by Promit
Way back, the OpenGL 2.0 proposal was introduced by 3dfx in order to significantly revamp and redesign the API, to modernize it, etc. In other words, everything that OpenGL 3.0 is supposed to be doing now. Through the magical process of decision by committee, it was cut back until OpenGL 2.0 did nothing but integrate some extensions. Essentially, the final result should have been called 1.5 -- the change to 2.0 was just historical baggage.

Some people try to claim that the major version number change was jusitifed because GLSL was introduced and that was a big paradigm shift etc -- this is bs. 2.0 just integrates more extensions into the core, just like every previous version. You can distinguish GL 2.0+ code because the GLSL stuff (CreateProgram, AttachShader, etc) won't have an ARB extension.


3dFX? That company was absorbed by nVidia in 2000.
It was 3D Labs who proposed GL 2.0 in 2002.

There was already GL 1.5 so it would have been called 1.6.
2.0 was a good marketing term similar to DX8, DX9, DX10.

BTW, they added GLSL, MRT, NPOT, point sprite, separate blend equation, separate stencil.
I program with core features so I prefer that things become core.

PS : there is no garantee that what happened to GL 2 won't happen to GL 3

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Quote:
Original post by V-man
3dFX? That company was absorbed by nVidia in 2000.
It was 3D Labs who proposed GL 2.0 in 2002.
Oops. I mix up the two companies a lot...and the 1.5 was a typo. Monday morning [sad]

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Okay, so basically there isn't that much difference really. Same header files etc, right?

I'm still looking for 2.0-specific tutorials, i.e. ones about how GLSL, MRT, NPOT, point sprite, separate blend equation, separate stencil, etc are done differently.

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I would say you don't need a GL2.0 specific guide/tutorial, just learn the extensions you need to use, then apply them, all GL2.0 really means is that the entry points to the extensions are part of the core functionality, which translates to not requiring glew etc to access them (if you are lucky enough to use a platform that actually includes GL2.0 as standard, meaning not MS) and being able to drop the ARB/EXT/NV extension from the end of the name!

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