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snowfell

The path of the programmer...

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Hey, I was just wondering if I could get some tips before I move onto the more advance programming. I have read through a book on the basics to C++ (about 200 pages, included everything from simple text to arrays), and I was wondering if their was anything I should cover before moving onto a more graphical style of programming. I know I want to go for opengl after I am done with the basics of C++ but I would like to know what is important to learn and take from C++. I don't have any experience with win32 or any GUIs yet, would this be important to cover before moving on? I have just earned enough money to buy my next text book and I was wondering what kind of things I should look for in this book. I have about 3 recommended books pick out but before I buy any of them I wish to make sure I have all this covered first. I would really like to skip glut and move right to the opengl API by itself if possible, is this a good idea? I did a little practice with glut a little while ago, and I hope its enough to know the basics. Hmm any other tips or advise would be great, just want to get all these road bumps out of the way before I start the more advance stuff. Thanks :)

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It really depends on what you learned in that book. If it only goes up to arrays I don't think it covers a whole lot. Make sure you understand pointers pretty well. Also look into different types of data structures such as vectors, lists, and stacks since arrays aren't used a whole lot other than in very beginner games (since array resizing is difficult).

I haven't used a whole lot of OpenGL but I would suggest looking for a book that goes slowly through the material so you can really understand what is happening. Look out for books that type lines and lines of code and never explain it (sounds stupid but lots of books do it). I'd suggest while reding to take some time and try to understand the underlying concept, for example if you type a whole bunch of code, ask yourself what does the code do and why do I need it?

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programmermattc makes a point, arrays are not very in depth. I would recommend checking out the C++ Workshop the threads in there cover a great amount of C++ in a good easy to learn way. The Sams books are great references as well, they work well for building up your knowledge 1 piece at a time.

I've found for myself, that online tutorials and problems are a great way to learn, also getting source code that does something you want to do from various places and reading over it is something i find useful.

I hope this helps


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Do some acm problems

http://www.acm.inf.ethz.ch/ProblemSetArchive.html

you just use stdio to read in and spit back out data, and they are great puzzles
im competing next year again.

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Now that I think about it my book that I read on C++ only cover the basic concepts. What I really need is a way of getting a problems and then solving it. I know that is what Microsoft programming books do, is there any online way of doing this (where I can be given a exercise, solve it, send it in, then see if I did it right). I know this may see stupid to many but this is the way I learn. Maybe I have to go out and spend 80$ on a microsoft text book, but if there is a easier or cheaper way of drilling these things in my head please let me know.

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Quote:
Original post by snowfell
Now that I think about it my book that I read on C++ only cover the basic concepts. What I really need is a way of getting a problems and then solving it. I know that is what Microsoft programming books do, is there any online way of doing this (where I can be given a exercise, solve it, send it in, then see if I did it right). I know this may see stupid to many but this is the way I learn. Maybe I have to go out and spend 80$ on a microsoft text book, but if there is a easier or cheaper way of drilling these things in my head please let me know.


I believe there was some website about programming math problems recently on the forums, something about Euler.

As for books I learned most of what I know in C++ from this book and various web resources. That book covers lots of topics in C++ and after being read becomes a nice reference book. I don't remember the contents of the book (since I'm at work) but I don't think stuff on data structures is included in that book though I know there are at least 2 chapters on pointers and 2 chapters on classes.

Most data stucture stuff you can find references about online.

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project euler is awesome for that, theat is the one being thought of.
http://projecteuler.net/

good luck
mathmo

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Like everyone here is recommending I also recommend you actually write some simple console c++ programs now to make sure you grasped and retain the basics of c++.
Personally, I don't think anyone should try to do any graphics programming until they have written several 500 to 1000 line programs in C++.
Also, I would recommend everyone using C++ at least get a copy even if they haven't read it of either the Stroustroup book or this book that will cover the most if not all the technical details of the language and questions that are sure to pop up when writing them larger programs in C++!
As afar as the original questions go you don't need to learn Win32 programming to start with Opengl. You can skip glut if you want but hopefully your C++ will be up to snuff by this point that the extra C code doesn't scare you-LOL!

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