Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Stevebeans

2D MMO - Online or .exe?

This topic is 3805 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I apologize in advance if this is in the wrong section, but i'm in the process of planning my design for an MMO my brother and I are working on, and we're debating between putting it as a complete online MMO or a downloadable application. There are pros and cons to both, but the biggest pro about putting it online will be the reach. It's not a highly involved graphical game so a majority of the functionality shall be there if we put it online, however that leads to the pro of the .exe, the remaining functionality. It'll be nearly impossible to give everything we want to give with a pure online version, however we'll likely have a larger player base, granted the majority will expect a largely free game which is hard to handle in MMO's without giving them a ton of micro-transactions. What would you guys suggest for the best platform to design this game on? Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
"putting it as a complete online MMO or a downloadable application."

do you mean

"putting it in a web browser or a downloadable application"

Otherwise im not entirely sure what you mean. An MMO is inherently online (because thats what to O stands for). To say "online MMO" doesnt really mean anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm just throwing this out there so feel free to disregard it, why not both?

You could use a smaller Free web-based version to market your game, attracting paying users to your .exe membership version that has more functionality/features/content. The transition between the two would be easier for your users to make if the two separate communities could interact (web/.exe), so the interactions between the free/paying users can keep your world consistently populated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
why not both?

Limited resources. Creating one good client is hard enough, creating two with different technologies is more than a small team can handle.

I can't answer the OP's question, but I can say why I chose to go browser-based with the game I'm writing:
  • I know the technologies and architectural decisions involved better.

  • I have few graphic and no sound assets.

  • I don't want to deal with installation/configuration problems. If it runs on IE, Firefox, and Safari, I'm set.

  • I want to get a first version out as soon as possible, while I'm motivated to do it, and be able to fix or add stuff on the fly.


Sure, there were reasons to create an executable client too, but the cons outweighed the pros. My advice is putting them on paper and making your decision based on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by grekster
"putting it as a complete online MMO or a downloadable application."

do you mean

"putting it in a web browser or a downloadable application"

Otherwise im not entirely sure what you mean. An MMO is inherently online (because thats what to O stands for). To say "online MMO" doesnt really mean anything.


Yes, sorry for the confusion, I meant a web browser vs application.



And Ruby, very good points about why keeping it as web based. I'll definitely keep that in mind.

Gyrthok, we're also considering that but like Ruby pointed out with resources and speed of release. An application alone will take long enough, let alone making it web browser complaint. That being said though, our longterm goal is to do that.

Thanks everyone!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you do it purely browser and http based, you also hit another market segment - slackers like me that sometimes want to play from work and are stuck behind firewalls ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you do it in Java or Flash, you will have a large number of potential players that don't need to install or actively download anything else (especially with Flash), but you still get highly interactive applications.

I would prefer to use Haxe (compiling to Flash) for a 2d online game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
From a technical standpoint, it is actually a very simple decision to make.

A web-embedded program is going to need to download all of its content before it can be used. A stand alone application can maintain this content locally, and can fetch it far more rapidly.

If the volume of content you intend to be using is large, you are pretty much required to use a stand alone application. If it is small, you can use either freely, and would thus likely be more interested in the embedded application for the purpose of all the other simplifications it provides.

And for the sake of argument, 2D does not equate to few assets. Large sprite tables can easily span many tens or even hundreds of megabytes. If you have a large amount of assets and want to embed, you must also consider the cost associated with loading resources, and are going to pretty much be forced to multithread your application for the purpose of surviving the network latency associated with file fetching that just isn't there with local resource fetches. Also, you'll need to manage this against your game required communication so that your prefetching doesn't swamp the network.

Personally, I'd go with a installed application, and just make it really easy to work with. It opens you up to a lot more freedom with respect to the type of assets you can use and the resources you have at your disposal. That way, if you happen to fall under that threshhold that would make a web embedded program a reasonable choice, you don't pay any penalties. If you go the embedded route, and use more than is practical to put into an embedded game, then you're in deep trouble, and may end up with something that is technically sound but utterly unplayable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know that the sort of people who play MMO's like to play them online, because online content is easier to access wherever they are, and often slips through browsing permissions set by school administrators (unlike downloading, which is often disabled). Making it work online could also make it possible to access on a web-enabled cell phone, which is another thing they like to do. The alternative for them would be to carry a jumpdrive with .exe and resources, which is far less comfortable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Drigovas
A web-embedded program is going to need to download all of its content before it can be used. A stand alone application can maintain this content locally, and can fetch it far more rapidly.

If the volume of content you intend to be using is large, you are pretty much required to use a stand alone application. If it is small, you can use either freely, and would thus likely be more interested in the embedded application for the purpose of all the other simplifications it provides.


I think this is not such an important point nowadays. With broadband connections being very wide spread today and the quasi-standard and high broadband services such as youtube on an all time high the argument doesn't hold anymore.

I would rather prefer a game that I can play right away instead of downloading as you say hundreds of megabytes of content. I also don't see how multithreading is important or relevant in this regard.

A good example is probably Second Life. It's not browser-based but all it's content is stored on the server side and streamed to the client.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!