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devronious

Infinately small, help...

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I want to represent a number that is infinately small in an eqation: F=(kq1q2)/r^2 You probably recognize the electric force of charge formula. So I want to replace r^2 with infinately small symbol. Is there such a thing? F=(kq1q2)/(infinately small)

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How about 'dx'? It's often used in Calculus as the variable of integration, and it's meant to be "infinitely small".

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It's not for code. I'm creating physics equations and want to write them correctly, therefor ansi codes efficiant

I intend to show them to other people and would like them to be professional.

Thanks Much,

Devin

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For something infinitely small, why not just use "1 / ∞"? This would of course mean your equation simplified to (kq1q2) * ∞

Regards,
ViLiO

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I think you are looking for this:

F = lim ( ( k * q1 * q2 ) / n^2 )
n->0

What is the context though? taking limits can often cause real problems, and this case is a strong example. In what circumstances does the limit exist? What values of k, q1, and q2 is F defined for? If you can't answer this ( not so simple ) question, then you are out of your depth.
Clearly dividing by 0 is not defined, and that is what you are asking to do.

Mathematically, if you intend for merely an arbitrarily small value, then this would be better:

There exists a small epsilon > 0, such that F = ( k * q1 * q2 ) / epsilon^2

which is obviously valid for all k, q1 and q2.

Another point to bear in mind is that many physical formulae do not hold for r -> 0. So what you are trying to deduce may well be false. If you provide me with more context, I will try and help some more.

Mathmo

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Thanks for your help guys. I need to do some serious thinking to figure out which is right for this application.

Again, thanks.

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Quote:
Original post by devronious
I want to represent a number that is infinately small in an eqation:

F=(kq1q2)/r^2

You probably recognize the electric force of charge formula. So I want to replace r^2 with infinately small symbol. Is there such a thing?

F=(kq1q2)/(infinately small)


If r is a distance, then it can't be infinitelly small. Even if you'd permit a computer simulation to have both things on the same place, the resulting vector MUST point out of coordinate space. Thus it's irrelevant.

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Raghar,

I'm not sure what you mean. Can you explain?

Maze Master,

I'm trying to create a formula a=b/c where c can become infinately small so that a can be infinitely large. b/c is important and must be b/c and no other math relationship. Does such a thing exist?

-Devin

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