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blood sport

best machine language?

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Assembly. Or if you intend to write an actual application or something, C++. You don't "get" the language, any more than you "get" French or Spanish or whatever. You can get the compiler / assembler with the SDK tools you get from being a registerd Sony developer though.

Altrernatively, Google has loads of results like This one.

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As a further note, if you go with assembly language (absolutely stupid), the PSP uses an ARM-based processor, so you'll want to learn the ARM ISA (EDIT: I might be confused -- is it ARM or MIPS?) rather than say, x86.

EDIT2: Yeah, it's a MIPS R4000-compatible processor. Durr mosho.

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I don't think you quite understand the concept of "machine language" -- There is no "best" there is only one for a given processor.

The PSP (and PS2, and PS1 before it) uses a variant of the MIPS instruction set, which is more or less the epitome of the RISC design philosophy. It's widely considered to be the most "pure" form of any RISC instruction set; so I guess, at least, that it could be considered "best" from that standpoint.

While you wouldn't want to code in pure machine language (which is just a string of binary words) you probably mean the "assembly language" -- which is a human-readable form of machine-code (only semantic abstractions, no real logical ones). Of this, there may be a few different syntax dialects (I'm not certain; in x86 land the two popular dialects are AT&T and Intel forms) but all instructions mnemonics will always be present, or at least have a direct, 1-1 mapping.

All this said, you don't really want to do much programming even in assembly language. C, C++ and other high-level languages were invented for a reason. Assembly language is good for precisely two things: 1) optimizing small parts of the code that bottleneck the application, and 2) writing compilers or self-modifying code.

It's said that 10% of the code is executed 90% of the time. Therefore, it only makes sense to perform any non-trivial optimization on that 10% of code. Looking at it from the production side, this means that the 90% of non-performance-critical code should be written towards other metrics such as readability, maintainability and verifiability -- time spent with low-level optimizations here is next to worthless -- this is precisely what higher-level languages empower you to do.

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Assembly language (x86) was my first language...I wouldnt recommend that to anyone. Its nice to know but I look back on the code I wrote in it and even though its quite commented I still wonder what the hell I was doing in it. It's readable....barely....

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Thanks for the input guys!


Ravyne,

You hit the nail on the head when you mention RISC and yes your right when you say a person doesn't want to program in machine langage except were it brings out better performance, excuse the spell pz. Oh, and yes I'am wondering were I can get the psp r3000 instruction set and the SDK machine code for the psp?


Thx for all the answers to my last post here!

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Quote:
Original post by blood sport

Thx for all the answers to my last post here!

Why is this your last post here? If you are going to be making games you should be here often.

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