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Animation School vs. University

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I was just wondering if it was IDEAL to goto a private school to study Computer Animation (e.g. SCAD in ATL) or a traditional 4-year university studying Fine Arts - Drawing/Painting. I am wondering if you can acquire a job at a highly respectable animation or gaming company (Pixar, DreamWorks, Disney, EA, Blizzard, etc.) by going to a school such as Georgia State University and studying Fine Arts. Possibly even taking the courses online at AnimationMentor.com to learn the animation side. Maybe even a minor in computer science since I'm working on a CS degree ATM. I'm interested in working for tv/film animation companies and the gaming industry. I've worked with ppl in the web design field who pursued animation at AI and were unable to get a great job in the field. I'm worried that I may have the same problems.

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In all honesty if you have a good portfolio you can get a job at those places with a law degree from harvard. In the industry all a degree really shows is you can complete something if you are good at what you do they don't care what your degree is in.

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Not to speak down to those who have followed that path. But "generally" those specialized schools are attracted by and made for, those who like to cut corners. Going to a traditional 4 year university will give you a way more well rounded education. Some may consider the "well rounded" part as superfluous, but to be honest, that is what makes the individual standout and succeed. Being well rounded not only still lets you follow your chosen path, but it will in effect increase your likelihood to adjust and evolve in whatever your chosen career is. And that is why you'll generally see more educated people climb up the ladder, while those who took to the specialized schools generally stay where they are.
In reality, both choices are valid and perfectly fine, but vary in what effect you're going for. Though, of course there are exceptions. Heck, if you're skilled enough, something like the lack of educational achievements will not hinder your ability to climb up the ladder, truthfully, it all comes down to you. But a complete education definitely assists in this.

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Original post by Jarrod1937
Not to speak down to those who have followed that path. But "generally" those specialized schools are attracted by and made for, those who like to cut corners.

I don't think you know much about SCAD, sir.

The Savannah College of Art and Design is a highly respected, accredited institution offering the B.A, B.F.A, M.A., M.Arch., M.A.T. and M.F.A. degrees in a wide variety of disciplines, as well as e-learning and certificate courses. Students are required to complete the same general education requirements as at any other accredited U.S. college, a comprehensive athletic department participates in the NCAA Florida Sun Conference, and its interior design program was ranked in the top 10 by Design Intelligence, a monthly design and architecture journal. It is generally ranked among the top 10, nationwide, in design schools.

My recommendation for art students is to attend art schools. There is nothing cut-corner about the curricula found at SCAD, SVA, Pratt or RISD (PDF). These are grueling, comprehensive programs by all accounts - I've visited both SVA and Pratt in preparation/consideration for graduate school applications; at Pratt I was gently told to take another year to improve my core drawing skills. These aren't Collins or Westwood.

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Original post by Oluseyi
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Original post by Jarrod1937
Not to speak down to those who have followed that path. But "generally" those specialized schools are attracted by and made for, those who like to cut corners.

I don't think you know much about SCAD, sir.

The Savannah College of Art and Design is a highly respected, accredited institution offering the B.A, B.F.A, M.A., M.Arch., M.A.T. and M.F.A. degrees in a wide variety of disciplines, as well as e-learning and certificate courses. Students are required to complete the same general education requirements as at any other accredited U.S. college, a comprehensive athletic department participates in the NCAA Florida Sun Conference, and its interior design program was ranked in the top 10 by Design Intelligence, a monthly design and architecture journal. It is generally ranked among the top 10, nationwide, in design schools.

My recommendation for art students is to attend art schools. There is nothing cut-corner about the curricula found at SCAD, SVA, Pratt or RISD (PDF). These are grueling, comprehensive programs by all accounts - I've visited both SVA and Pratt in preparation/consideration for graduate school applications; at Pratt I was gently told to take another year to improve my core drawing skills. These aren't Collins or Westwood.

You're right, i didn't see that he mentioned SCAD in particular (not sure how i missed that), so i assumed he was considering one of those "specialized" animation schools.

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Original post by Jarrod1937
You're right, i didn't see that he mentioned SCAD in particular (not sure how i missed that), so i assumed he was considering one of those "specialized" animation schools.

Yeah, those "specialized" schools are pretty horrible. Cool. Just wanted to clarify. [smile]

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I am a Pratt Digital Arts/Computer Animation alumni- the program was fucking horrible. I graduated in May 2007 so by the time you go, things may have improved (we had a promising new Chair after many years of alcoholics and interrims). You will probably get the same experience at most art schools, though, their CG programs stink. If you have a choice, do your research- we just hired a few people from Ringling, which if you can get in, I would heartily suggest- one of the only colleges I know of first, second, or third hand, that really has their act together regarding digital arts.

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