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Gawain22

Making a 2D RPG

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Hi everyone , I am new to game development and programming. I thought that trying to create a 2D RPG (probably a really simple one) would be a great way to get myself started in game development and help me learn a programming language. The problem is I do not really know what programming language and/or game engine to use. I have thought about using the Python Programming Language. I looked at the PyGame engine and it looked nice. I'm not just not so sure I like the idea of putting up the code for my game as open-source , though. I would also like to be able to use a game engine that would allow me to sell it commercially. I know that in the beginning it probably won't happen , but as I learn I would like to be able to create a game that could maybe be sellable when I learn enough about programming and game development. I would really want to keep my beginning costs low , at around $30 to $50 for the program I would be buying , or maybe a book or two on the programming language I will be using. Wow , I typed a alot! Any help would be appreciated ; thanks.

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Hi,

to be quiet honest, and I don't wanna burst your bubble, I think you're taking the wrong approach to making games.

Learning a programing language (any programing language) takes a lot of time on it self let alone make games. It is something you can learn from books, but it requires a lot of time and patience. And creating a game is a lot of work even for a simple 2D RPG.

I think the best thing you can do, is forget about making money on a game for now, and concentrate on learning the basics of the language you wanna use. Once you have a basic knowledge of the language, you should start doing guessing and text games.

That's just my modest opinion though.

I hope you enjoy programing, and making games. It is very fun although can be very frustrating at times =)


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Original post by roloenusa
Hi,

to be quiet honest, and I don't wanna burst your bubble, I think you're taking the wrong approach to making games.

Learning a programing language (any programing language) takes a lot of time on it self let alone make games. It is something you can learn from books, but it requires a lot of time and patience. And creating a game is a lot of work even for a simple 2D RPG.

I think the best thing you can do, is forget about making money on a game for now, and concentrate on learning the basics of the language you wanna use. Once you have a basic knowledge of the language, you should start doing guessing and text games.

That's just my modest opinion though.

I hope you enjoy programing, and making games. It is very fun although can be very frustrating at times =)

Yup, if you wanna make money quick learn Flash and make something catchy. Hopefully you are also a good artist so you don't have to share any little profit you happen to make.

But Kongregate's Greer thinks that Flash games won't really get out of the gaming ghetto until developers are able to charge for them. As it stands now, the advertising and sponsorship money involved is just too small. "Let's say Armor Games gives you a sponsorship for $2,000. You get another $1,000 from ad revenue, another $1,500 from prize money, maybe Miniclip licenses your game for $5,000... you might make $10,000 to $15,000 on your Flash game -- and that's a really successful Flash game."

The relatively low ceilings mean the best developers tend to not stick around in the Flash market, Greer says. "What seems too bad to me now is that developers will have a big success in the Flash game world and then they're kind of forced to change platforms if they want to go beyond that -- they're forced to take a job at EA or scrape and scrounge and find a way to get a game on Xbox Live Arcade."

But convince players to pay a small fee for the games, and everything changes, Greer says. "If you made a Flash game that was good enough that you could get 50,000 people to pay $2 for the game -- or maybe it's a hit, you get 200,000 people to pay $5 -- now you've totally changed the economics of what you can do. You can get a really good artist to help you and work for six months. You can do deep multiplayer missions, you can do co-op, you can do all kinds of stuff that isn't really available right now.

Otherwise, start hitting the C++ books so you can actually try to get a game programming job somewhere and definitely be getting paid to make games!

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Quote:
Original post by Gawain22
Hi everyone , I am new to game development and programming. I thought that trying to create a 2D RPG (probably a really simple one) would be a great way to get myself started in game development and help me learn a programming language.

As mentioned above, a 2D RPG is probably too high a starting point. I know that by today's standards they look simple and therefore people assume they are easy, but even the 2D RPGs of 15 years ago had several programmers, several artists, and several designers working together for months and months to come up with the games.

Quote:
The problem is I do not really know what programming language and/or game engine to use. I have thought about using the Python Programming Language. I looked at the PyGame engine and it looked nice. I'm not just not so sure I like the idea of putting up the code for my game as open-source , though.

Python is a good language for beginners. PyGame is good enough for 2D RPGs although personally I would recommend the pyglet library as that takes advantage of modern graphics cards. Your code doesn't have to be under an open source license just because you use Python. However it can be easy for people to find out how you implemented your game. Is that really a problem?

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Alright , thanks everyone. I guess I'll start learning the Python Language then.

Quote:

Your code doesn't have to be under an open source license just because you use Python. However it can be easy for people to find out how you implemented your game. Is that really a problem?


I thought if you used Pygame's engine you had to submit the code of your game as open source? Or are any modifications to the engine open source?

I'll definatley take a look at the pyglet library , thanks.

When I said RPG I meant a really basic one like walking around on one level and swinging a sword. Sorry for the conufsion.

I was also thinking about making a MUD, it was suggested I make a text based game to learn before I make a RPG , but I assume that'd take a lot of knowledge of network code? Maybe I could just make the text-based part first and then worry about all the networking code like usernames , passwords , logging in , etc.?

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PyGame uses the LGPL license, which is less restrictive than the GPL license and doesn't require you to make your program open source.

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Original post by Ezbez
PyGame uses the LGPL license, which is less restrictive than the GPL license and doesn't require you to make your program open source.



Ah , great. Thanks.

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<quote> I was also thinking about making a MUD, it was suggested I make a text based game to learn before I make a RPG , but I assume that'd take a lot of knowledge of network code? Maybe I could just make the text-based part first and then worry about all the networking code like usernames , passwords , logging in , etc.? </quote>

Exactly. The idea is that making any kind of program requires a whole bunch of practice. In addition, games are generally quite complex programs. You need to start simple yes, and work up from there. Make a text based, single player, "choose your own adventure" style game. It might sound outrageously simple, but trust me, if you have no experience yet, it will be eye opening.

Never focus on how much time things are taking. Its going to take a while, its not time wasted doing simple stuff, its time invested working towards to good stuff. Before you know it, youll be sitting back, looking at what youve made, and itll impress yourself!

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Original post by BreathOfLife

Exactly. The idea is that making any kind of program requires a whole bunch of practice. In addition, games are generally quite complex programs. You need to start simple yes, and work up from there. Make a text based, single player, "choose your own adventure" style game. It might sound outrageously simple, but trust me, if you have no experience yet, it will be eye opening.

Never focus on how much time things are taking. Its going to take a while, its not time wasted doing simple stuff, its time invested working towards to good stuff. Before you know it, youll be sitting back, looking at what youve made, and itll impress yourself!


Thanks for the tips. I started a text-based game in Visual Basic 2008 a few months ago and managed to program choosing your name , age , and class.

Now I guess it's time to learn how to make a complete text-based game in the Python Language. =)

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