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Besome Games

Becoming a freelancer developer

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I'm just curious about how somebody would approach this sort of thing. I have a good looking resume including a two year internship, time in a professional office, and an independent game I have written and sold myself. Are these even good enough qualifications for this sort of thing? I have never done things like networking or 3D graphics, just 2D games. The only place I've found was RentACoder.com. Practically none of the jobs on there met my area of work. I'm just kind of lost before I can even start. Any suggestions or pointers specifically for being a freelance developer? I would think with my experience I could find a job in an office somewhere, but relocation isn't really an option given my financial situation. There isn't any game development companies around here. It seems like freelancing would be the best solution to this. Possibly the wrong forums?

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Hi Bes, you wrote:

>I'm just curious about how somebody would approach this sort of thing. ...
>Any suggestions or pointers specifically for being a freelance developer?

Read FAQ 63: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson63.htm

>I have a good looking resume including a two year internship, time in a professional office, and an independent game I have written and sold myself. Are these even good enough qualifications for this sort of thing?

No. Read FAQ 49: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson49.htm

>I have never done things like networking or 3D graphics, just 2D games.

That's a problem too!

>relocation isn't really an option given my financial situation. There isn't any game development companies around here. It seems like freelancing would be the best solution to this.

No, it's not. Read FAQ 27: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson27.htm. You need to use the Barrier-Busting tips: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson24.htm. Get a job, get more experience, before freelancing will be a realistic option for you.

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Quote:
Original post by Besome Games
and an independent game I have written and sold myself.


This would make me raise an eyebrow, and I'd be proud of that accomplishment. but it depends on relevant experience to the contract you are trying to get, this may not be enough.

the life of a contractor is hard and un-secure, its all about learning new skills as you go along keeping yourself up to speed with new technology. Sometimes you have to take what is presented to you, which may or may not be related to games. More often than not its often an exercise of survival.

Quote:

RentACoder.com.


Not sure about this at all, I browse from time to time and it appears to be highly competitive and the only way to make money would seem to be to already have something developed that already fits with what the clients want. Some of the costs are un-realistically low for the demands of the clients to develop something completely new.

Generally its good to have a few years of industry experience underneath your belt before you do this, that way you'll learn new skills and more about the operation of the companies you may be employed by. Unless of course you're some sort of Phd student whos created a proven free energy device in your spare time and now wish to market it under your own company name. (or some sort of product)

Being a contractor has its good and bad points, it is a life where you can choose when you want to work, but you just need to be prepared a little more. It can be good for you if your that certain type of person, but it can also be a lonely life.

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We hire freelancers as needed.


They are used to perform the tedious grunt work that we don't want to do, such as creating a whole bunch of in-game elements, minigame quests, and other side-code after we have completed the first few core levels in house. Or we use them to generate all permutations of models and art and such that can't be created automatically, again after we've proven the core technology in house.


They are generally have:
* Teams of people, not just one individual
* A proven track record of publishing or at least assisting in the same genere of games
* All the neccessary tools and software, including devkits and first-party agreements if required

Generally this means giving them anywhere from an estimated 1500 to 5000 work-hours of the project (that's between .75 and 2.5 work-years), and giving them five to ten weeks to do it.

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Quote:
No. Read FAQ 49: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson49.htm
This is the best FAQ I've ever seen on your site, Tom. This should be required reading before posting here.

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