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mUrk616

"Hello World!"

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Lame introduction/subject line, I know, but I'm a clown so whatever. :) Anyways Hi everyone. I've been dabbling in programming since I was about 12, but never got anywhere with it. I was always just limiting myself to QB 4.5 and back then high-level programming languages just confused me, as I did not have the patience I now possess. I know an awful lot about DOS/Windows, but not enough about *nix systems, which is a shame and eventually I'll learn. I had went to college for one semester with a major in Computer Science, but my mother got ill and I had to drop out to take care of her. I actively play music and am considering going back to college for my previous major, but I'm not sure exactly when that will happen. In my spare time, when I'm not working or playing with my band, I have developed a newfound passion for programming, and I'm just doing basic little shite with Bloodshed's DevCpp linked with Allegro. For the short time I was enrolled in college, I learned a bit more about theory, so that has helped me a good bit, but I'm still learning on a daily basis. I guess my first question would be, should I focus perhaps on a different library than Allegro? And my second would be, "How about Python with the PyGame lib?" 'Cause I saw a thread in this section where someone was asking about PyGame, so I researched it a bit, knowing absolutely the faintest about the Python language, and it looks nice, and very simple actually. Just introducing myself and whatnot. My name is Mark, by the way. Thanks.

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Welcome to GameDev!

Python/Pygame is often recommended because it is easier to grasp than C++ and its libraries. I haven't used it, but it is quite popular, so if you like it then give it a go and find out if you like it.

Second, I suggest that you drop Dev-C++ for Code::Blocks or Microsoft Visual C++ Express Edition 2008. Both are free alternatives to Dev-C++, and both offer more features, most important of which is that they are actively maintained. Dev-C++ is essentially abandoned and has been for some time. It will only cause you headaches.

Nice meeting you.

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I really like Python, and PyGame as well. It gets my seal of approval.

BTW, I think you also have the term "high level programming language" confused. It refers to abstract programming languages, rather than complicated or difficult ones (actually, the reverse is usually true; most high level programming languages are relatively simple, since they hide some implementation details from you). As an example, QBasic (during its time) and Python would be considered high level while C and assembly are lower level. Then again, I could be reading too far into your words and you already understand this perfectly fine, but I'm just being thorough.

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Maybe I was getting "high level programming" and OOP mixed up...

Like I said, I'm still basically a n00b to anything but QB. (sad but true)

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Well, I've had C++ for Dummies, but I hardly use it as
a reference point anymore, as I have most of the basics down.
I've been using Allegro tutorials
I've found online in different places (mainly allegro.cc),
but as far as data, functions and structures, etc., I just
reference chm manuals. I am, as stated above, learning more
everyday about c and allegro coding. I was moreover asking
if there is a better lib than Allegro for c++, I think.

Also, I suppose any problems I'm having with my coding could be taken up
with the good people of this forum. :)

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Quote:
Original post by mUrk616
Like I said, I'm still basically a n00b to anything but QB. (sad but true)
Coming from QB, you'll probably find Python to have a much smoother learning curve than C++.
I have yet to try PyGame but I've not heard a bad thing about it! The same can't be said for C++ and it's libraries, although Allegro looks like a capable game engine which ought to simplify things somewhat.

To be bluntly honest, I'd say save yourself the trouble of C++ for the time being and learn a friendlier language: Python is a great choice or if you fancy something more "C++ esque" then there's C# or Java.

If you are wanting to learn C++ then there's plenty of people here than can help you if and when you get stuck [smile]

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Quote:
Original post by mUrk616
Well, I've had C++ for Dummies, but I hardly use it as
a reference point anymore, as I have most of the basics down.
I've been using Allegro tutorials
I've found online in different places (mainly allegro.cc),
but as far as data, functions and structures, etc., I just
reference chm manuals. I am, as stated above, learning more
everyday about c and allegro coding. I was moreover asking
if there is a better lib than Allegro for c++, I think.

Also, I suppose any problems I'm having with my coding could be taken up
with the good people of this forum. :)

Having used Allegro,SDL,DirectX,etc with C++ and Pygame with Python I can tell you personally that no there isn't another library for C++ that will make it any easier to make games with C++ if that's what you want to hear.
You really should go with Python/Pygame combo if you ever want to finish a game though.
I mean the same 2D games I made in Python/Pygame that took me like a week or less to do in Python/Pygame took me 2x as long or more using Allegro and C++.

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I can also reccommend PyGame. Python is a very friendly language and also a very capable one. There are not many choices which will allow you to get an image loaded and drawn quicker! This allows you to concentrate on the logic and problem solving involved - and surely these are more universally transferable skills.

Although excellent for learning, Python isn't just a disposable language - I see myself using Python/PyGame for years to come when trying out new ideas; IMHO it is an ideal tool for prototyping.

You can also work with it in an OOP style (if you want to build on these skills).. I often force myself to use techniques that I am accustomed to using in c++ or Java.

PyOpenGl is also a good library for moving into 3d - PyGame also handles stuff like image/texture loading and input for you here. The OpenGL functions are effectively identical to their c++ counterparts (but with less strict type/pointer intricacies) and so the knowledge is once again quite transferable.

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