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Alph@1

magic in movies ?

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Your question doesn't make sense. Perhaps you can expand on the short one line question?

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If you're referring to special effects for movies, the short answer is no. You'd be better off using 3d rendering and film editing software such as Maya and After Effects.

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For special effects in films you're going to be using a commercial 3d package that has strong dynamics capabilities (such as Houdini) or a custom in-house tool.

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Whilst Crysis and the likes may look awesome with DirectX and OpenGL these days, these models & effects would look pretty ordinary in a film based on special effects.

I went to a 'making of Star Wars' convention a few years back and there was a scene in Episode 1, where they had a render farm of over 300 computers. Even with this rig, it still took 12 hours to render one frame of movie.

As good as the latest Geforce and Radeon cards are, they are still some way off this sort of power.

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Quote:
Original post by Alph@1
thanks all,
So what purposes do OpenGL use for ???

Real time rendering of graphics. Graphics in films are of much higher quality and are prerendered.

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Typical film special effects companies will use special 3D graphics applications like Maya, Softimage, Lightwave, Renderman to produce thier work.

These programs often use an API like OpenGL inorder to display images for the the 3D animators and modelers to work with. Often these are quite simplified representations of the actual 3D model with basic lighting to allow the artist to work efficently in real time.

Once a shot is in a near finnished animation state it is sent to the render farm.

A render farm is basicly a dedicated network of computers tasked with rendering the shot. It can take many hours to render even a single frame due to the possible complexity of the shot involved.

From there the shot is often sent to another group of artists known as compositors. Usualy a shot itself is broken down into a number of elements, and the compositor layer these together to create the final shot seen onscreen. This allows them to retain elements that work, while re-rendering elements that don't work. This allows faster overall work production without haveing to go back and re-render an entire shot if something messed up.

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Most artists use many commercial 3d package for their work. So, after becoming an OpenGL expert, what can i do ? I think that maybe, learning graphics APIs is just for only interesting. How do you think ?

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