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Alph@1

magic in movies ?

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Whilst Crysis and the likes may look awesome with DirectX and OpenGL these days, these models & effects would look pretty ordinary in a film based on special effects.

I went to a 'making of Star Wars' convention a few years back and there was a scene in Episode 1, where they had a render farm of over 300 computers. Even with this rig, it still took 12 hours to render one frame of movie.

As good as the latest Geforce and Radeon cards are, they are still some way off this sort of power.

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Original post by Alph@1
thanks all,
So what purposes do OpenGL use for ???

Real time rendering of graphics. Graphics in films are of much higher quality and are prerendered.

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Typical film special effects companies will use special 3D graphics applications like Maya, Softimage, Lightwave, Renderman to produce thier work.

These programs often use an API like OpenGL inorder to display images for the the 3D animators and modelers to work with. Often these are quite simplified representations of the actual 3D model with basic lighting to allow the artist to work efficently in real time.

Once a shot is in a near finnished animation state it is sent to the render farm.

A render farm is basicly a dedicated network of computers tasked with rendering the shot. It can take many hours to render even a single frame due to the possible complexity of the shot involved.

From there the shot is often sent to another group of artists known as compositors. Usualy a shot itself is broken down into a number of elements, and the compositor layer these together to create the final shot seen onscreen. This allows them to retain elements that work, while re-rendering elements that don't work. This allows faster overall work production without haveing to go back and re-render an entire shot if something messed up.

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Most artists use many commercial 3d package for their work. So, after becoming an OpenGL expert, what can i do ? I think that maybe, learning graphics APIs is just for only interesting. How do you think ?

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Original post by MSW
Typical film special effects companies will use special 3D graphics applications like Maya, Softimage, Lightwave, Renderman to produce thier work.

These programs often use an API like OpenGL inorder to display images for the the 3D animators and modelers to work with. Often these are quite simplified representations of the actual 3D model with basic lighting to allow the artist to work efficently in real time.

Once a shot is in a near finnished animation state it is sent to the render farm.

A render farm is basicly a dedicated network of computers tasked with rendering the shot. It can take many hours to render even a single frame due to the possible complexity of the shot involved.

From there the shot is often sent to another group of artists known as compositors. Usualy a shot itself is broken down into a number of elements, and the compositor layer these together to create the final shot seen onscreen. This allows them to retain elements that work, while re-rendering elements that don't work. This allows faster overall work production without haveing to go back and re-render an entire shot if something messed up.


I actually had a senior project where my mentor worked at a 3d studio that worked on some films and commercials. They used Maya for animation, Modo for modeling and 3d stills with its stronger render power and zbrush to finish sculpting the base models.

Various lighting, textures, and shadows are rendered out as different layers and then composited together in another program to speed rendering times. They also use displacement mapping on lower poly models. These work like complex bump maps where they literally change a models geography during the rendering process (its a small step up from the normal map.) This is them composited into the live-action or into another 3d scene where it is used for the scene.

With big advancements in technology bigger scenes can be renders in smaller time.

The first Shrek movie took about 4 or so months of straight rendering in a render farm to be completed while the latter Shrek movies could be rendered in less than half that time.

OpenGL works well with games because games can be made to do different things, it needs to be functional for more than one purpose and has to deal with real-time rendering. Knowing how to use OpenGL will allow how you create a game and what it's graphics are like so it there is mor variety within the game. I'm a little tired so this might not be completely accurate but basically if you know how to use OpenGL than good for you I'm sure it will help in life, although I think if you want to learn it I think it's best to look into it first.

When all else fails and you don't know the answer, goole first before asking a question. :D

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A rather recent real-world example.

The closest thing to OGL:
Quote:
To optimize render times, the studio rewrote shaders and created a new tool called Spangle to preview RenderMan renders in realtime. “It renders on NVIDIA cards,”


Numbers:
Quote:
“For Batman Begins, we had 200 RenderMan licenses, each of which ran on dual-processor machines,” Franklin says. “For this film, we beefed up to 900 licenses, each running on four processors — 3600 processors.
Quote:
The lower resolution reduced the data requirements to approximately 160 MB per frame
Quote:
“In 1999, when we worked on Pitch Black [released in 2000], we needed to access 2 TB of data,” Franklin says. “This show used over 100 TB of data.”
Quote:
For tracking, the studio uses boujou, PF Track, 3D Equalizer and a proprietary photogrammetry toolset.
Quote:
To create the road, they photographed the surface at 5K resolution with Canon EOS-1DS Mark II still cameras and LIDAR-scanned the surface to produce a terrain map.


Key word here is render farms. It doesn't matter how a single machine can handle the data, one needs hundreds of machines for visual effects of any kind.

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It's true to say that an individual system isn't much cop for large-scale effects in film, but if you're just interested in learning about CG for film, and the basic workflow, then the personal learning edition of Maya will run on a single machine. But there is a huge gap between the prerendered CG that a home user can achieve compared to a real studio. And neither has much of a crossover to games development - the crucial point being that film CG is prerendered, games are real-time. You're talking about rendering scenes in milliseconds compared to hours or more.

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