• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Math book recomendations (not directly related to game development)

This topic is 3496 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I finished my high school education recently and got into collage, I enjoy math and physics and I would really like to understand some more advanced concepts of them. I already picked up physics book that interest's me ("university physics") and by coincidence it's on the "additional literature" list for the course. The math course unfortunately hasn't got anything good in that section so I'm going here for help :) The things that interest me the most: calculus and linear algebra How much I learned in high school (some terminology may be off because of language difference): calculus: derivation (drawing the function with help of derivation, angle between functions, tangent in point, normal in point), integration (calculating integral, area calculation, volume calculation) I would like the book to contain the simple things that I already know to get a better theoretical base, and also to contain the more advanced stuff (calculus with vectors) linear algebra: I lack any real education in this field, I use it almost daily in game development but all I know is what I have picked up from the internet. I plan on buying a book from the local bookstore, so I'll give you a link to browse what they got. The site is in Croatian, but don't worry the book titles are in English and you just have to list a few pages to see them all: Calculus: LINK Linear algebra: LINK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I know you plan on buying the books at your local store, but I have some suggestions if you end up looking elsewhere. "Numerical Linear Algebra and Applications" by Biswa Nath Datta provides very good coverage of the topic. The version listed on Amazon is not current, as the current version was published in 2003 (and I believe he is working on a new version, but have no idea when it will be done). A bit of a disclaimer: he was a professor of mine, but he taught well and I liked his book. The book does assume you have at least a bit of a linear algebra background, but at the same time it gives a chapter of 'review.'

Another great, general book covering many numerical algorithms is "Numerical Recipes 3rd Ed. : The Art of Scientific Computing." While it is not really a textbook to teach from, it is a great reference for a wide variety of numerical algorithms. It provides C code for implementations.

I can get you ISBN numbers for either books, or more recommendations when I get home if you want them (I'm at work right now). If you ever want to get into any abstract algebra, I've got some recommendations there too. =)

Good luck in your studies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know any of the books listed there on the linear algebra page, but I would advise that books published by Springer tend to be more theoretical and advanced than the other publishers. That might be what you want, but they won't necessarily be a good starting point for a subject that you aren't yet an expert at. My advise, then, would be to avoid the Springer books for now. The books published by Academic Press, Wiley, and Prentice Hall are probably all comparible, and should all be decent introductory theory and technique references. I am not at all excited about the one book offered that is published by McGraw-Hill.

My thoughts about the publishers mentioned above also apply to the Calculus book offerings. Some books are likely a bit better than others, but if you pick something from Academic Press, Prentice Hall, Addison-Wesley, Wiley (but I'd advise to skip the "Dummies" book), and *not* McGraw-Hill), you'll probably have a book that is either completely adequate or quite good.

If the editions you are able to buy are in English, many of them should be fine. If they are translated into another language, I cannot advise about the quality since the translation can be quite tricky to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@Dranith

Thanks for your suggestions, but I'm limited to this bookstore and its book inventory.

Also about the second book, I'm currently not interested too much in algorithms and their implementation.

The abstract algebra is definitely more interesting to me, but I want specifically to get a good foundation on advanced calculus and linear algebra.


@grhodes_at_work:

I'll look more into the books for publishers you recomended. The books are in English.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I second grhodes_at_work that you'd be best to skip the Dummies books or the Schaum's outlines. I've found those are decent for studying for a test when you've already been given a nice introduction to the material, but those books usually are either not self-contained enough or just not well-written enough to function as introductions themselves.

The fact that you're limited to the local bookstore makes this choice harder. The only calculus book there I've heard of is Forgotten Calculus. I personally haven't read it, but it got phenomenal reviews. It doesn't appear to cover vector calculus, though, so that's a minus.

If you ever decide to go beyond that bookstore, I feel I should mention here that Principles of Mathematical Analysis by Rudin is generally considered the best introduction to calculus/analysis. Overall it's a little overboard for game development, but I'm not sure if there's such a clear, rigorous, and yet understandable approach anywhere else.

As for linear algebra, I'm again not familiar with any of those specific books. However, the Undergraduate Texts for Mathematics series tends to attract good, professional authors, so I'd consider the yellow one called Linear Algebra by Serge Lang. However, I'd also heed grhodes_at_work's warning: books in this series do tend to be more theoretical and axiomatic.

I hope this helps you out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"CALCULUS [A Complete Course]" by Robert A. Adams (Addison-Wesley publisher) seems to be the favorite for now, since it goes from limits to vector calculus.

@nilkn
I'll look into Serge Lang's book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Hecker has some useful suggestions: http://chrishecker.com/Physics_References

and I think "Pauls Online Notes": http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by nilkn

If you ever decide to go beyond that bookstore, I feel I should mention here that Principles of Mathematical Analysis by Rudin is generally considered the best introduction to calculus/analysis. Overall it's a little overboard for game development, but I'm not sure if there's such a clear, rigorous, and yet understandable approach anywhere else.


Understatement of the year! Rudin is crazy-hard. Sure its great stuff and if you take the time to work through it you will improve your pure math skills tremendously, but most mathematics majors don't even get to it until upper division courses, or even grad school.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement