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MossStone

NPR Rendering Techniques

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I'm creating a game which I'd like to have a fairly unique rendering style. I'm just starting to research how to do this, looking into Microsoft's NPR rendering sample from the XNA website, and also reading up on how Valve worked on Team Fortress' style. I was wondering if anybody knows of any articles that might help me. Ideally the style I want is like this: http://beetart.com/galerie_detail.php?r=illustration&k=nazha&i=mexico3.jpg Which is also similar to how the Diablo III backgrounds look, especially in the outdoor scenes. For example: http://www.blizzard.com/diablo3/_images/screenshots/ss31.jpg Also do you think that this is possible? And would a combination of modelling, texturing and rendering be key to implementing a style like that, or could I use regular models and textures with custom shaders? Any help would be very appreciated.

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I think the diablo example looks like it does because the textures that they use for the background have that same hand painted feel, and are not drastically changed by lighting.

I think the best way to get the painted look for real time rendering, is to try to mimic part of the drawing process:

-Large swatches of color: try to do a pass that just draws large swatches of the base colors, without details, shadows or lighting. Those would be added in the next passes.

-Draw outside the lines: instead of filling each polygon properly as is normal, try rendering several passes of the same thing, but making them somewhat transparent, and wiggling the verticies a bit with each pass. That way it looks as though the color was added in several strokes that didn't line up properly.

-Be sloppy with details: first off, don't add all the details that are really there. Those details that are there could be distorted slightly,out of place, or a bit blurry.

-Add texture: don't add textures to the objects, but try adding an underlaying texture to the make the image look as if it's been drawn onto an imperfect surface, such as paper or canvas. This should be a subtle effect, just a slight variation of darkness.

If you do get something working, please post it!

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