• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Any good Cross Platform IDE/Compilers?

This topic is 3456 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Im currently working on a project that is targeted to be multi-platform. But, we are currently using VS C++ 2008 as our compiler because it looks good and works well. But, soon, some developers we be coming into the project that work on linux only, and we dont want to have 2 seperate IDE project files. Are there any good Cross Platform IDE/Compilers? Thanks, GanonPhantom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I don't know of a good IDE. But, Scons is really good for writing cross-platform build scripts. You can write a single SConstruct file, then on Windows it'll build using the MSVC compiler, on Linux/Mac it'll build with gcc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could try Code::Blocks. It can import your MSVC project and use the MS compiler on windows, while running ontop of GCC on your linux machines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NetBeans works with C++ too. Though frankly, you're going to need separate build scripts, glue code, infrastructure stuff... The benefits you get from using visual studio outweigh the benefits you'd get from having shared project files.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Use the best tools for the platform. That means use Visual Studio on Windows, and provide whatever you need for your Linux guys seperately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've always liked Eclipse IDE. It's normally used for Java programming, but it also support C++ using GCC as the compiler. It has most of the the features you need in an IDE and works both on Windows and Linux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Install borland c++ 5.0+ there free comand-line compilers then integrate it with a source editor with a good graphical interface and ta-ta you got a great free "almost an integrated development enviroment" like compiler. The installation is not easy as with all command-line compilers but it really pays off, if your looking for something commercial you got try borland c++ builder, but the best thing about the free version is that you get to choose your GUI instead of having a fixed one and you can change the gui anytime >.< but i'am not sure it has a debugger. You can do the same thing with mingw32, but i warn you if you have never done it before do NOT custom install the packages it can be very confusing, instead download the complete package or the installer, follow the instructions and it should work out. Then install the source editor and configure it to run with your compiler. I think if it comes down to managing very large projects you should look for something more commercial because managing many files in command line compilers can be very tedious. The good thing about most of the command line compilers is that they are pretty much platform independent, I mean you should see how many platforms ming can run on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What we currently use is: separate environments use different IDEs, but we have a common build works-everywhere via script.

The problem with using different IDEs, is project file management. When someone adds a file to VS, the guy that uses Anjuta will have to manually add it to his project. This process is very error-prone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm using Eclipse on Linux with CMake as the make file generator. Has been working good this far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement