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beginner question looking for cross platform 3d engine

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Hello all i like to start doing casual games in 3d and i hope not to reinvent the wheel so to start i need cross platform ( linux , mac , win) 3d engine that is freeware can you experts give me recommendation about such engine . im c++ programmer . so engine in c++ will be great. Thanks allot

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I'm also a beginner, and I'm curious what engines are a good idea to start with, if anyone can provide some helpful tips in that area.

I'm not especially looking to develop for several desktop platforms, but I'm concerned with the possibility of an engine that can port to one or more consoles, should I want to go that route later.

As far as style of game, I have several rough concepts, and most of them would seem to favor "sandbox" gameplay, if that matters. I would like an engine that is capable of producing expansive environments. I'm new to programming (brand new, actually), so something relatively easy to learn while being full of features would be good.

I've been checking various engines and middleware SDKs from internet searches, and it seems to be a huge list with some being "free" and a ton costing somewhere beyond my means. I would absolutely like to produce commercially, but for now I'd just like to use the "big boys' toys" and learn as I go.

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For Mac/Windows/Linux cross platform, in the free category:
In the non-free, but still affordable category:
Keep in mind that there are many other engines out there, but these are some of the most respected, and definitely among the best for cross-platform support.

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the important question for me is what is more standard fixable for NOT beginner programmer (10 years ) but new to 3d programming ( not 3d concepts )
from the wiki i read its seams that there is more sympathy with the OGRE engine .

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If you're looking to put something out there with the smallest learning curve, make sure you pick an engine with a good support community. I don't know if you can find this in the free category. We use C4 at work and are extremely happy with the support.

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Depending on what you want to do with your game you might need to be mindful of the license. If you are working on free stuff/commerical PC then the LGPL licenced engines will be fine as long as you at least link to a dll holding the game engine. But SeeThirty was talking about consoles and the LGPL engines won't work as there is no real way for the user to make changes to the engine code.

I know this is fairly useless for a beginners forum, but it never hurts to think in the long term. Be a shame to spend a few years tooling around with a engine and making a great game you want to sell only to find out the day before shipping the engine license is incompatible.

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just to be sure , the IrrLicht and ogre license has no problem to
be used in commercial right ?
another question that im not sure to find in the docs of the engines
what engine is more flexible in terms of video cards ( im not sure this is the right terms )

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Quote:
Original post by umen242
just to be sure , the IrrLicht and ogre license has no problem to be used in commercial right?
IrrLicht's license pretty much allows you to do what you want with the engine an code. OGRE is LGPL, so you can use it in commercial software, as long as you dynamically link (normal for PCs, not possible on most consoles).
Quote:
what engine is more flexible in terms of video cards ( im not sure this is the right terms )
IrrLicht probably has the best behaviour on ancient cards (and even a pair of software renderers), but you pay for it in flexibility - modern effects can require hacking the engine source itself. OGRE provides a decent balance, with a pretty robust fallback system, and good shader support. Horde3d only runs on recent cards (and not on most integrated GPUs), but you get the full power of a modern, shader based approach.

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When you say "beginners" engine, what features are most difficult? Aside from great support are there particular places you want extra resources, certain features, etc? That may help to narrow down selection -

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well basically i like to start learning some "engine"
my direction is more to casual games that runs on simple computers
that support networking ( p2p )
maybe in the further to do something bit more complex.

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We can keep throwing suggestions at you, but ultimately you are going to have make a decision. Yes, you actually have to make a choice, not us. If your problem is that the suggestions so far are not acceptable, you need to indicate why not, so we can make better suggestions.

You are a beginner, so starting off on the "wrong" engine is not harmful to you. At the very least, you gain experience in using one to build a game. Right now, all you are doing is just sitting and waiting, and that's not particularly productive. Stop worrying about the choice so much. It's not a lifetime commitment you are making, you just need to get started right now.

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Thanks for the reply
well im of course started to work on the irrlicht engine
it seams that it will support more simple computers and its learning curve is
simpler then others (and maybe im wrong..).
i just wanted to hear from the more experienced folks before i jump in.
thanks

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Quote:
Original post by thedustbustr
If you're looking to put something out there with the smallest learning curve, make sure you pick an engine with a good support community. I don't know if you can find this in the free category. We use C4 at work and are extremely happy with the support.


Imperative! to check the dynamics of the community(forums) before you get into the meat of it. Seriously, it does play a big role when you got a bunch of like minded coders discussing elements and creations... worst case, you got gamedev pros to tackle your needs ;^)

Good Luck!

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