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grill8

Question about copyrighting software assets.

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Hello, I have some questions about copyrighting software assets. Examples are: source code, textures, sounds, shaders, models etc. I did some research and found that source code is automatically copyrighted for you until otherwise specified. Questions: 1) Does this hold true for textures, sounds, shaders, models etc. 2) I want to allow usage of my source code and other assets in a single project (either personal or commercial) by another person/company but to otherwise retain all rights. Simply put, they may use the source code in a single project only (either personal or commercial) but to not be allowed any other rights to it. Does such a license exist? How does someone go about finding a license etc. for such a thing. Any tips/tricks involved in copyrighting that I have overlooked? Thank you for your help. Jeremy (grill8)

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1) *Any* creative work is automatically copyrighted by the author.

2) Get a lawyer to write up a custom license agreement for you.

Other) AFAIK if you publish something publicly without stating that it's copyrighted, then people can argue that it has become "public domain" and ignore your copyright.

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Jeremy wrote:
>1) Does this hold true for textures, sounds, shaders, models etc.

Yes. But why not copyright them? It's not expensive or difficult.

>2) I want to allow usage of my source code and other assets in a single project (either personal or commercial) by another person/company but to otherwise retain all rights. Simply put, they may use the source code in a single project only (either personal or commercial) but to not be allowed any other rights to it. Does such a license exist? How does someone go about finding a license etc. for such a thing.

Check out Creative Commons on Wikipedia. If that doesn't work for you, hire lawyer like Hodgman said.

>Any tips/tricks involved in copyrighting that I have overlooked?

Registration. Check out www.copyright.gov.

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Quote:
Original post by Hodgman
Other) AFAIK if you publish something publicly without stating that it's copyrighted, then people can argue that it has become "public domain" and ignore your copyright.

Yes they may argue it but they are wrong. There is no legal requirement to mark a work as copyright and publishing something does not put it in the public domain. The IP owner would actually have to state that something is public domain for it to be so.

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Just to clarify:

In almost every country of the world, copyright protection is automatic. There is no registration or formal process. Even a three-year-old's scribbles have automatic copyright protection.


In a few countries, copyright enforcement may require some form of formal process. In the US, you must register the copyright in order to get statutory damages and recover legal fees.



Those international treaties and agreements specify an automatic 25 year copyrights on photographs, 50 years from the first showing on cinematics, and 50 years from creator's death for other works. Nations are permitted to extend it if they wish.


Unless specifically put into the public domain by the copyright holder, there are no game assets entering public domain for a very long time.

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