Sign in to follow this  
giugio

[matrix]modelview and projection

Recommended Posts

giugio    246
I'm not really understand what do the 1)MatrixMode and Projection Matrix 2)MODELVIEW and modelview matrix
glViewport(0,0,width,height);						// Reset The Current Viewport

	glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);						// Select The Projection Matrix
	glLoadIdentity();									// Reset The Projection Matrix

	// Calculate The Aspect Ratio Of The Window
	gluPerspective(45.0f,(GLfloat)width/(GLfloat)height,0.1f,100.0f);

	glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);							// Select The Modelview Matrix
	glLoadIdentity();			

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
haegarr    7372
The MatrixMode selects which of the 3 matrix stacks OpenGL knows is affected by sub-sequently invoked glTranslate, glRotate, glMultMatrix, and so on. E.g. with the MatrixMode set to GL_PROJECTION the projection matrix is affected.

The projection matrix is part of the mapping of the 3D scene (as is seen from the camera (or eye)) to the 2D screen. E.g. one kind of projection, namely the perspective projection, is responsible for the depth foreshortening, i.e. that objects more far away appear smaller.

The MODELVIEW matrix is for transforming the mesh of a model from its local co-ordinates to world co-ordinates (the MODEL portion of the matrix), and then from the world co-ordinates to the camera (or eye) co-ordinates (the VIEW portion).

Looking at all those transformations, OpenGL applies them as
P * V * M
where P denotes the matrix that is build when GL_PROJECTION was active, V is the view matrix, and M the model matrix, in summary build when GL_MODELVIEW was active.

Utility routines like gluPerspective build a projection matrix, as glFrustum and glOrtho do, too. So they are sensefully to be invoked when GL_PROJECTION is active (although they _can_ be invoked for any other matrix stack, too).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GreyHound    150
I'm also confused by the matrices since i started working with OpenGl. But somehow i was always able to acchief what i indended.

Can it be described like this?

Projection:
That's how the "photo" of the 3d space is taken. It defines how to project the 3d coordinates onto the 2d screen.

Modelview:
Describes the object'S alignment in comparision to the global world.

Modelviewprojection:
Does this actually deliver pixel coordinates for 3D points? That's basicly what i'd understand.

Remember, i asked this as a question, don't take is as an answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
haegarr    7372
MODEL is how the object (a.k.a model) is placed in the world

VIEW is how the world is placed w.r.t. the camera (or, in other words, its the inverse of how the camera is placed in the world)

hence MODELVIEW is how the objects are placed w.r.t. the camera

PROJECTION is how the 3D scene seen through the camera (i.e. already influenced by the MODELVIEW) is made 2D; (okay, this is a bit coarse; there is a little bit more to do; in fact the projection matrix computes a cube from the visible volume (see below) and that is mapped then to the pixel of the screen, but this level may not be of interest here)

In the above to "place" means a combination of positioning, orientating, and perhaps scaling, whatever is used.

The usual projection is perspective projection. Assume you shoot a ray from the camera's position through each pixel of the view. Since all these rays start in a single point but go throught different pixels, they are not parallel but can be seen as a pyramid. Now, all these rays are a line-of-sight, each one for the particular pixel they pass through. Hence, in principle all surface points of objects hit by a particular ray are to be mapped onto the same pixel. The frontmost pixel will hide all others behind, and hence will be displayed in the end.

However, the projection matrix does exactly this when being set-up as perspective matrix. It does it in another way: It transforms the space so that the rays all become parallel. Then all hits of a particular ray will have the same (x,y) co-ordinates, but still different z (depth) co-ordinates.

If you ask how it could be done to make those rays parallel, then I must say that I was a bit sloppy. In fact, not a pyramid but a frustum is used by cutting the apex of the pyramid. For such a construct the space can be scaled in local x and y direction until the rays are in parallel. Such a frustum is called the view frustum, and glFrustum (if using OpenGL) is useable to set it up. The fact that the pyramid cannot be scaled accordingly is the reason why the near plane must have a distance greater than zero (see the parameters of glFrustum).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Quote:
Original post by haegarr

However, the projection matrix does exactly this when being set-up as perspective matrix. It does it in another way: It transforms the space so that the rays all become parallel. Then all hits of a particular ray will have the same (x,y) co-ordinates, but still different z (depth) co-ordinates.


Let me add few points here

1. Here the perspective transformation converts a point in (homogeneous) eye
coordinates (x,y,z,1) to a point in clipping coordinates (x',y',z',w'). The clipping coordinates are converted to normalized device coordinates (x'',y'',z'') by dividing with w (homogeneous coordinate). The first two coordinates, (x'',y''), obtained thereby determines the image point. The third coordinate, z'', is used for visible surface determination by means of the Z-buffer algorithm, where points lying closer should have a smaller z'' value.

2.In raster graphics technique, no ray is generated from the camera. This idea is only in ray tracing technique.







Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
haegarr    7372
Quote:
Original post by serious_learner07
2.In raster graphics technique, no ray is generated from the camera. This idea is only in ray tracing technique.

Technically that is correct, but the rays help (IMHO) to undestand why the viewing volume is a frustum. That's the reason I've mentioned them. But you're right: I have should hinted at this being used for explanation only.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this