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Motoxpro

Where to go from here

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Hi, I have a few questions regarding what opinions you guys have on the direction I should take right now. I'll give you a little background, I had always planned on programming games at sometime or another after I got out of college, but in general I just like to program. I've always liked the Visual Basic language probably because its the easiest for me to understand, so after tinkering around with that for awhile in high school I went to a community college and took some Visual Basic classes. I've taken all the classes that they offer and have a little bit of time before I transfer to a 4-year to get my Computer Science Degree. I had planned on just getting a job as a VB programmer making misc apps for companies, however, lately I've just been wanting to pursue a game programming career. So my questions are: What language do you think I should learn? I know most developers use C++ but I've seen alot of people around here talking about C#, could someone tell me why one would learn C# if they just had to learn C++ later even though they are similar? What language do most colleges use/require for their degrees? I've looked at C++ alittle but its different in alot of aspects to VB, where do you think I should start? I geuss thats all I can think of for now, I'm sure I'll have more later.

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Well
1. If you Like VB then use VB later on you're going to use more languages.
2. I really don't get you by Have to use c++ later on.
3. Well I never been to one but often I think c++ or java.
4. I really don't know.

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Well
1. If you Like VB then use VB later on you're going to use more languages.
2. I really don't get you by Have to use c++ later on.
3. Well I never been to one but often I think c++ or java.
4. I really don't know.

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What language do you think I should learn?
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Im not an expert by no means but I do have some experience with this area. I am currently in my second year of college going for my degree in computer science, with a huge emphasise on game programming. This is how I would put it most games are made in C++, now more games are made in C# but not even close to the amount of games made in C++.

I think your best bet is too remember that you are going to need to learn more languages as you go, I know C++ and C#. As for game programming if you know any C language you should be good.

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I know most developers use C++ but I've seen alot of people around here talking about C#, could someone tell me why one would learn C# if they just had to learn C++ later even though they are similar?
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C# and C++ share alot of syntax they look very similar. C# is alot more efficient in the area of memory management and such and is a really great language. The main reason that you would learn C++ is for the game programming. I know that some may disagree but from what Ive seen and heard C++ is still king and widely used everywhere for game programming. Its alot faster than say C# because C# hides alot from the user and you really dont see how bulky it can be in the hands of an untrained programmer.

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What language do most colleges use/require for their degrees?
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I dont about most colleges I know that mine has me learning C++,C# and Assembly.
I have seen others that teach Java as well. Basically it will be any combination of those languages most of the time.

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I've looked at C++ alittle but its different in alot of aspects to VB, where do you think I should start?
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The thing is you will find C++ is a hard pill to swallow without a really good teacher and book. Its a lot more labor intensive than VB. I would suggest that, since you have time, you go to your library and pick up some books on C++ kinda leaf through them and you want to find a book that can explain things in plain english because I know that alot of them will just boggle your mind for no reason and its usually because the person who wrote it dosnt know how to speak any other way, beginner or advanced.


Hope this helps. Good Luck!

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Quote:

I know most developers use C++ but I've seen alot of people around here talking about C#, could someone tell me why one would learn C# if they just had to learn C++ later even though they are similar?

C# is my primary language, so take this with a grain of salt.

I believe knowing C# first can help you get into an OOP mindset which will help once you start with C++, especially since C++ doesn't require you to develop in OOP.

Also, maybe it's just me, but I see a lot of VB developers transition over to C# without any problems (or VB.NET developers, but I don't know the difference, if there is one).

Quote:
What language do most colleges use/require for their degrees?

My college required C++ and Java.

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If you want to become a games programmer then you will have to learn C++. You will probably have to learn it in university.

In the meantime I strongly suggest Vb.Net to learn yourself with.

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Not to be contrary, but it's not 100% necessary to know C++ to be a game programmer. I concede the vast majority of successful and failed games have C++ engines. This due to attempts to guarantee performance. You can afford to learn something else until you get into an ancillary position where you can have someone instruct you on the use of the high end C++ IDEs and tools. Just learning straight C++ won't do you a lot of good until you learn why and how it's used. Unfortunately, that comes from experience so I'd suggest you set some smaller goals. Game programming takes dedication and patience. YMMV

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Quote:
Original post by Jack9
Not to be contrary, but it's not 100% necessary to know C++ to be a game programmer. I concede the vast majority of successful and failed games have C++ engines. This due to attempts to guarantee performance. You can afford to learn something else until you get into an ancillary position where you can have someone instruct you on the use of the high end C++ IDEs and tools. Just learning straight C++ won't do you a lot of good until you learn why and how it's used. Unfortunately, that comes from experience so I'd suggest you set some smaller goals. Game programming takes dedication and patience. YMMV


I agree that it does take alot of experience to understand C++ and how it is used. After 2 years I feel like I am just starting to really grasp the language. It takes time.

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Obligatory Python mention.

I won't go into a long discussion of why python "is an amazing beginner language and even does your dishes!". But I love programming in Python. The only reason I don't use it exclusively is that it's interpreted instead of compiled. Be sure to look at python before you make your decision.

Having said that, if you already know a language, and know how to use it effectively, at least half the battle is won. Picking up almost any new language will be fairly easy. C++, C#, Java, Python, whatever. C++ will just take a little more determination.

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Thanks alot for all of you guys input. So far what I've been leaning toward is starting to learn C# and XNA, mainly to help me transition from VB.NET, and then continuing on with C/C++ while I'm at university. One of the main reasons I wanted to do this is because while I am familiar with VB, I would call myself fluent by any means and the concepts that help people carry over from language to language arent as ingrained yet.

One of my main questions now is how much C# do I need to know before I start fiddling around with games? I know I cant just expect to go in and program a game with very little knowledge, but what are the main concepts of the language that I should focus on? I ask this because I've found its easier for me to learn when I have a clear path intead of just "read this book and then program for a year or 2 before you start." Thanks

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