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deadstar

Open sourced engines

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Following a thread in the lounge about wishes to see popular games open sourced, it got me thinking. Is there a recent, all-singing shader-based engine available open source? I know there are a lot of efforts like the Cube engine and such, as well as id's offerings, but they're getting on a bit. Google isn't helping me much. I'd love to take a look. I know there's controversy about learning from source code, but this is mainly curiosity. On the other hand, has anyone here released their pride and joy with source?

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Fantastic, I'll take a look at them all.

The big problem I was having was finding how to make the jump from fixed function to FULLY shader-based. From the few examples I've looked at, I concluded that (in OpenGL) vertex arrays and glDrawElements remains, but anything to do with materials, textures, colour, shadows etc is done in a shader. Does this mean that EVERY renderable object must have a shader?

Making the jump from a fixed-function engine to a full shader engine is proving difficult, and I was hoping looking at existing examples would help. I'll have a browse through.

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Original post by deadstar
Fantastic, I'll take a look at them all.

The big problem I was having was finding how to make the jump from fixed function to FULLY shader-based. From the few examples I've looked at, I concluded that (in OpenGL) vertex arrays and glDrawElements remains, but anything to do with materials, textures, colour, shadows etc is done in a shader. Does this mean that EVERY renderable object must have a shader?

Hard to shade something without a shader, so yes.

Of course, a lot of objects will presumably reuse the same shader, so it's not like you need to write a shader program for every object you render.

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Original post by Spoonbender
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Original post by deadstar
Fantastic, I'll take a look at them all.

The big problem I was having was finding how to make the jump from fixed function to FULLY shader-based. From the few examples I've looked at, I concluded that (in OpenGL) vertex arrays and glDrawElements remains, but anything to do with materials, textures, colour, shadows etc is done in a shader. Does this mean that EVERY renderable object must have a shader?

Hard to shade something without a shader, so yes.

Of course, a lot of objects will presumably reuse the same shader, so it's not like you need to write a shader program for every object you render.


So were my presumptions correct? Fixed function vertex arrays remain (until Geometry Shaders kick in at least)?

I'll draw up a plan and get some sort of demo together during the week.

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Original post by deadstar
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Original post by Spoonbender
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Original post by deadstar
Fantastic, I'll take a look at them all.

The big problem I was having was finding how to make the jump from fixed function to FULLY shader-based. From the few examples I've looked at, I concluded that (in OpenGL) vertex arrays and glDrawElements remains, but anything to do with materials, textures, colour, shadows etc is done in a shader. Does this mean that EVERY renderable object must have a shader?

Hard to shade something without a shader, so yes.

Of course, a lot of objects will presumably reuse the same shader, so it's not like you need to write a shader program for every object you render.


So were my presumptions correct? Fixed function vertex arrays remain (until Geometry Shaders kick in at least)?

I'll draw up a plan and get some sort of demo together during the week.


Well, you would need to send vertices so that they get processed right?
Even if you use geometry shaders, you will send vertices or some kind of data down the pipe.

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