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ManaStone

How intelligent are kangaroos?

37 posts in this topic

I’ve been hearing lately how Australia could reduce green house emissions by eating more kangaroo meat instead of beef. I don’t have a problem with killing cows or deer for food, but for me it just seems wrong to kill kangaroos. The fact that they are bipedal makes them seem more human to me. Does anyone know how intelligent they are compared to cow, sheep, or deer?
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Original post by ManaStone
I’ve been hearing lately how Australia could reduce green house emissions by eating more kangaroo meat instead of beef. I don’t have a problem with killing cows or deer for food, but for me it just seems wrong to kill kangaroos. The fact that they are bipedal makes them seem more human to me. Does anyone know how intelligent they are compared to cow, sheep, or deer?


I think it's around 12.
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Kangaroos are quite intelligent, so intelligent in fact that they can operate shoulder mounted stinger missiles! http://www.sie.arizona.edu/sysengr/OOSE/kangaroo.html

But I think that they are actually generally pretty intelligent.
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From my highly unscientific observations of the animals, I'd say kangaroos are smarter than cows and sheep (which seem quite dim) but not as intelligent as pigs or octopi which are fairly commonly eaten in Western society.

I don't see any good reason to not eat kangaroo - we often have to cull them when their numbers get too high for the surrounding vegetation, so why not eat them? The main objection appears to be that kangaroo an Aussie symbol, but I'm not sure why that should be an issue.

I'm practically vegetarian though, so it's not as if it'll affect my diet.
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Original post by Tiffany_Smith
I always thought Kangaroos were an endangered animal.

One variety or another are pretty common throught most of Australia. You'll see mobs of Eastern Grey kangaroos if you drive between the big cities on the east coast; I saw quite a few when I drove back to Melbourne from Canberra a couple of weeks ago.
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Why does it matter how smart they are? They should eat humans since that would reduce green house emission far more. I mean I'd probably eat human meat if:

1. If they came precut and packaged. I don't feel like killing someone just like I don't feel like killing and gutting a cow.

2. If it was cheaper then other meats and more healthy.

3. If it was legal.

So yes I think they should eat kangaroos just like I think they should eat humans! [smile]
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Original post by EmptyVoid
2. If it was cheaper then other meats and more healthy.

This won't ever be true. Apart from humans being expensive to grow to maturity, there's a whole bunch of nasty diseases you can catch from eating your own species.

Unless you were referring to the kangaroos eating the humans. That's also a bad idea because kangaroos are herbivores, so they don't have the digestive system for it. You'd be better off packaging humans for the dingoes and the sharks.
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Original post by Trapper Zoid
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Original post by EmptyVoid
2. If it was cheaper then other meats and more healthy.

This won't ever be true. Apart from humans being expensive to grow to maturity, there's a whole bunch of nasty diseases you can catch from eating your own species.

Unless you were referring to the kangaroos eating the humans. That's also a bad idea because kangaroos are herbivores, so they don't have the digestive system for it. You'd be better off packaging humans for the dingoes and the sharks.


No I was saying I would eat human meat IF that was the case.
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One variety or another are pretty common throught most of Australia. You'll see mobs of Eastern Grey kangaroos if you drive between the big cities on the east coast; I saw quite a few when I drove back to Melbourne from Canberra a couple of weeks ago.

We had one on the front lawn a few years ago (BTW this was in the middle of Canberra - for those that don't know, this is the Capital city of Australia).

Quote:
I always thought Kangaroos were an endangered animal.

There are sever4al species of Kangaroo, and yes, some are endangered, but when most people talk about Kangaroos, they are talking about the Eastern Grey Kangaroo, and this one is definitely not endangered (it can be a pest a lot of the times).

It's numbers get so big, that they have to cull them. Some might think this is a cruel response, but the alternative is for the population to grow so large that they eat all the grass and have mass starvation (a far worse outcome).

One thing about Kangaroos is that they are adapted to the Australian environment (as the Eastern Greys demonstrate). This means that they can survive better on the vegetation and water levels found in Australia. It also means that the environment has adapted to them too, so they don't cause to much damage to the environment.

An example of this is with cows, their dung is rather moist (also a waste of water). The dung beetles native to Australia can't handle this moist dung. The result was masses of flys as they laid their eggs in the cow dung. The only solution was to bring in dung beetles that could handle it, and now the fly problem is getting under control.

So farming Kangaroos would actually be a benefit, we would ahve better control over their population, they wouldn't need as much resource (water and feed) and they wouldn't damage the environment as much.

The reason they are not farmed is that people have a hang up about eating them (I don't, I actually like the taste of Kangaroo more than beef - I had some Kangaroo sausages just last week).
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Original post by Edtharan
The reason they are not farmed is that people have a hang up about eating them.

And you need taller fences [smile].

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Everybody in this thread is wrong. [grin]

Kangaroo meat is on the shelves in supermarkets. Kangaroo steaks are tasty (taste pretty much life beef), and really, really healthy. Cheap, not so much. They'll only become cheaper if they were mass-farmed, and farming is a bit of a problem, because they're nomadic animals - they won't graze in a paddock, unless it's a large paddock. That's the fundamental problem with farming them. Public perception I can't comment on, although most people I know don't eat it because a) they haven't thought about it, and b) it's nowhere near as readily available.

Basically, we need some dedicated farmers, and things'll get cheaper. I wouldn't mind it - I like red meat, but beef's too fatty.
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If memory serves, Kangaroos are neurally wired such that they're only bipedal in the most literal sense. More monopedal, really. I say chow down.
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Original post by Iron Chef Carnage
If memory serves, Kangaroos are neurally wired such that they're only bipedal in the most literal sense. More monopedal, really. I say chow down.


.. So, what, they're just hairy pogosticks with an extra leg?
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Don't kangaroos run into the road and get smoked by cars like our deer, bears, moose and cows?
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Original post by Ravuya
Don't kangaroos run into the road and get smoked by cars like our deer, bears, moose and cows?

No. They jump into the road and total your windscreen.
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Original post by Ravuya
Don't kangaroos run into the road and get smoked by cars like our deer, bears, moose and cows?

No. They jump into the road and total your windscreen.


I can vouch for that. Driving along after dark whilst down under, one had the evolutionary disadvantage of being attracted towards headlights. Took a week to get the spare part to where we were in WA, very annoying - but probably more so for the 'roo.

I did also have a Kangeroo kebab, which tasted OK but not great. They're quite interesting animals so I wouldn't eat them if there was a shortage or anything, but there are lots of 'em down there.
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The first time I was in Australia years ago, I almost crashed head on into a group of Kangaroos somewhere halfway between Melbourne and Sydney. They were just standing around on the road in the middle of the night, not moving and probably attracted by the head lights. It was fucking scary, I barely managed to stop in time.
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yeah, that's why you don't drive in Aussie at night. A few years ago I was in WA and got delayed on a trip, and ended up driving until eleven. At one point a bloody great desert red actually cleared the bonnet and missed my windscreen by inches. I actually did end up hitting a rock wallaby (I think), but fortunately it was a small one, so no major damage done. Cutting it out of the "roo bar" wasn't pleasant though.

And for the record, I've eaten kangaroo and it's not bad. But I'd take crocodile over it any day. [grin]
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If the recipe is good... we kill actually intelligent beings every day and we don't even eat them.
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ive had kangaroo before not the tastiest meat but certainly palatable (better than crocodile anyways)

another meat suggestion is the possum
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Brushtail_Possum
70million of them here in nz (and thats after the government spending millions trying to wipe them out of the last 20+ years!)
, so a fair few burgers could be made
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Original post by zedz
70million of them here in nz (and thats after the government spending millions trying to wipe them out of the last 20+ years!)
, so a fair few burgers could be made


If you don't mind eating what looks like a giant cross between a rat and bat.
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