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ManaStone

How intelligent are kangaroos?

37 posts in this topic

Quote:
Original post by Kaze
If you don't mind eating what looks like a giant cross between a rat and bat.

You're thinking of the American possums. Australasian possums look like a cross between a rat and a rabbit. They're a bit higher on the cuteness scale.
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People are smart, that doesn't stop bears from eating us.

Don't let the pouches fool you, if a Kangaroo ever got the chance he'd slaughter you and your entire family.
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Yeah, judging my my driving experiences, I'm going to say Kangaroos are not very smart. I haven't hit any, but I've come close a number of times. One time I was flying along a rural road at 100KPH at night, and I round a corner and find a group of about a dozen of them just standing in the middle of the road. I had to do some pretty quick braking to avoid hitting them. What really got me was the fact that the buggers just stood there. I came hurling towards this mob in a big 4WD at high speed, and managed to pull up just a few metres in front of them. Half of the roos didn't even look up, and the ones that did just looked down again and didn't react. It took about 20 seconds before some of them got the message they should probably move, and they started slowly hopping off the road a few at a time.

And yeah, I took the next corner at 70 instead.
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I've eaten kangaroo. Not bad at all. I note, though, that the reason their meat is lean and good is probably that they are hunted rather than farmed. If they were domesticated as we've done to our more usual meat animals, they would no doubt be bred for meatiness and become fatty in no time, same as happened to cattle.
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Quote:
Original post by Trapper Zoid
Quote:
Original post by Kaze
If you don't mind eating what looks like a giant cross between a rat and bat.

You're thinking of the American possums. Australasian possums look like a cross between a rat and a rabbit. They're a bit higher on the cuteness scale.


They're bastards is what they are. As Zedz mentioned, there are millions of the little buggers here in NZ. They eat millions of tonnes of native vegetation every year, which destroys the habitats of native birds, and have even been known to eat native bird chicks.

Plus one of the bastards lives in my garden and kept me awake all last night scampering across my roof. Now where's my shotgun? Right....
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I eat kangaroo steaks around once a week. They are pretty expensive, yet they have almost no fat. They taste great, quite rich in flavour.

I would not recommend kangaroo sausages, they have so little fat that they don't taste that good (as sausages need fat for flavour).
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Quote:
Original post by Trapper Zoid
Quote:
Original post by Kaze
If you don't mind eating what looks like a giant cross between a rat and bat.

You're thinking of the American possums. Australasian possums look like a cross between a rat and a rabbit. They're a bit higher on the cuteness scale.


They are cute, but don't let that fool you... they have huge claws and very sharp teeth. One gave one of my old girlfriends a nasty scratch on her leg once when it wanted some food she was eating. Another nearly bit my finger off (or a nice chunck) when I thought I would try to pat one (I was a little drunk at the time and it looked so cute).
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Quote:
Original post by Nemesis2k2
Yeah, judging my my driving experiences, I'm going to say Kangaroos are not very smart. I haven't hit any, but I've come close a number of times. One time I was flying along a rural road at 100KPH at night, and I round a corner and find a group of about a dozen of them just standing in the middle of the road. I had to do some pretty quick braking to avoid hitting them. What really got me was the fact that the buggers just stood there. I came hurling towards this mob in a big 4WD at high speed, and managed to pull up just a few metres in front of them. Half of the roos didn't even look up, and the ones that did just looked down again and didn't react. It took about 20 seconds before some of them got the message they should probably move, and they started slowly hopping off the road a few at a time.

And yeah, I took the next corner at 70 instead.


Maybe they are very smart, and are trying to save lives by making drivers slow down and pay more attention?
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I'd totally be willing to try Kangaroo (or possum). Where do I sign up?
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Quote:
Original post by Moe
I'd totally be willing to try Kangaroo (or possum). Where do I sign up?

Just google it. Its common enough that its stocked in most of the major supermarket chains here, and Im sure theres plenty of exporters too.


Been a long time since Ive had Kangaroo, but from memory it wasnt bad. If it became popular enough to bring the cost down Id be all for eating it regularly. For that matter, I remember Emu being quite tasty too.
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I ran into plenty of kangaroos and wallabies in Australia, and ate roo meat a few times. Pretty tasty. I wish we could get it fresh here.
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