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I've wanted to learn programming for a long time now. Ive tried it before, but didnt really get anywere. I wan't to learn C++ and maybe even python but i dont know were to start. Ive looked at some books but, they seem like there written for people who already know programming, they have really complicated terms i don't even know about. I want to learn so these languages so I can make video games and work on a graphics engine but i dont know were or how, to start, so im asking for you guys help since alot of you seem very good at this. (please keep in mind i have NO programming experience, im an artist, trying to learn proggraming.) im looking for maybe a book, that has alot of hands on kind of stuff so i can try it myself, and not one were it shows all of this complex code and tells me what it does so im stuck and don't know how to do it myself. you know what i mean? i want to learn the code and how to make stuff. thanks

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http://www.gamedev.net/reference/start_here/

Also, start getting in the habit of looking up terms of that you do not understand. If a book is a solid guide uses a word 'inheritance' and you don't know what it means, look it up. Do not set down the book/tutorial because of word usage.

Programming wasn't easy to start learning (for me) because it requires a great deal of knowledge. Once you learn a good pool of knowledge, it makes everything easier. You learn how to learn, think, study, etc. I think the best programmers are probably not the ones who can program anything currently out right now, but the ones who are able to learn quickly and put what they've learned to great use right away.

Focus on learning.

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There are a number of non-programmer tutorials on the Python wiki, they take you through things slowly and describe things in terms of non-technical terminology.

Of course, you'll need to download Python before you can use it. Once you've installed Python you'll find it also comes with a piece of software called IDLE, this is an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) and it's what you use to enter Python code and execute it - it's a glorified text editor really.

C++ isn't a simple language for anyone to learn and if your aim is to make graphics and games then you're looking at 3+ years of learning before you produce anything of remote value. In Python you're looking at a few weeks depending on how quickly you read and pick things up.

Graphics with Python can be done by using Pyglet, which is a set of Python functionality specifically for making graphics - You can download and install it at any time, so I recommend you get to grips with Python itself before you look into Pyglet.

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Original post by dmatter
There are a number of non-programmer tutorials on the Python wiki, they take you through things slowly and describe things in terms of non-technical terminology.

Of course, you'll need to download Python before you can use it. Once you've installed Python you'll find it also comes with a piece of software called IDLE, this is an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) and it's what you use to enter Python code and execute it - it's a glorified text editor really.

C++ isn't a simple language for anyone to learn and if your aim is to make graphics and games then you're looking at 3+ years of learning before you produce anything of remote value. In Python you're looking at a few weeks depending on how quickly you read and pick things up.

Graphics with Python can be done by using Pyglet, which is a set of Python functionality specifically for making graphics - You can download and install it at any time, so I recommend you get to grips with Python itself before you look into Pyglet.


thats cool but can python do what C++ can do? graphically and non-graphically.

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thats cool but can python do what C++ can do? graphically and non-graphically.


Yes. You will find that most languages can do everything that C++ can do.

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Original post by rip-off
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thats cool but can python do what C++ can do? graphically and non-graphically.


Yes. You will find that most languages can do everything that C++ can do.


really? then how come C++ is so big in the video game dev buz. is it because its easy for buisnesses to work with?

Also. since im trying to make video games and a rendering engine dont i need to learn something like directx or openGL or something like that. or should i wait until i learn more?

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Original post by dmatter
There are a number of non-programmer tutorials on the Python wiki, they take you through things slowly and describe things in terms of non-technical terminology.

Of course, you'll need to download Python before you can use it. Once you've installed Python you'll find it also comes with a piece of software called IDLE, this is an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) and it's what you use to enter Python code and execute it - it's a glorified text editor really.

C++ isn't a simple language for anyone to learn and if your aim is to make graphics and games then you're looking at 3+ years of learning before you produce anything of remote value. In Python you're looking at a few weeks depending on how quickly you read and pick things up.

Graphics with Python can be done by using Pyglet, which is a set of Python functionality specifically for making graphics - You can download and install it at any time, so I recommend you get to grips with Python itself before you look into Pyglet.


also what is a library. I noticed you said that Pyglet is a library. what does that mean. Is it a bunch of code?

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Original post by bearanimations
how come C++ is so big in the video game dev buz. is it because its easy for buisnesses to work with?
Python is also big in the video game biz too actually. C++ is used because it has compilers available on many platforms and companies have existing code bases written in C++ and aren't about to just throw it all away.

Quote:
Also. since im trying to make video games and a rendering engine dont i need to learn something like directx or openGL or something like that. or should i wait until i learn more?
Pyglet takes care of this for you, it uses OpenGL under the hood. It does provide OpenGL functions for you to use directly too, should you need or want them.

Quote:
also what is a library. I noticed you said that Pyglet is a library. what does that mean. Is it a bunch of code?
You're spot on, it's just a bunch of code that makes common tasks (like loading images) in a certain domain (graphics) easier for you.

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Big game engines are already written in C++. It is expensive and arguably pointless to rewrite this code in a new language.

Games that are trying to push the hardware still prefer to write speed critical parts of the code in lower level languages. C++ tends to be at a level closer to the machine, and with effort can usually be pushed to perform as fast as or faster than other languages.

I want to stress a couple of the points here:

* It takes a lot of effort to make any language efficient. C++ is no exception to this rule.

* Most efficiency gains are made by improving the underlying algorithms (which can be done in any language).

* Most languages can have bindings to C. As such, if there is a task that you cannot do in a said language at sufficient speed, you can usually drop down to C.

An finally, there are a number of games that use Python.

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Original post by rip-off


* Most languages can have bindings to C. As such, if there is a task that you cannot do in a said language at sufficient speed, you can usually drop down to C.

An finally, there are a number of games that use Python.


What is a binding?
Quote:

Pyglet takes care of this for you, it uses OpenGL under the hood. It does provide OpenGL functions for you to use directly too, should you need or want them.


so lets say i learn openGl and get really awesome, does that mean i could make my own opengl code and use it in python?

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