Sign in to follow this  
bobsaget

OpenGL Real basic Q with dx9?

Recommended Posts

bobsaget    100
I have used opengl and c++ for a bit of time and liked its ease of a learning curve. The thing is I plan on using windows and a lot of the pluses of Opengl did not seem to apply. I wanted to check out dx9(running vista, but use xp more). When i looked at some source I was really surprised to see its shear length. I used opengl and wxwdiget for a lot of things, but win32 api was something I rarely touched. I noticed a lot of the decelerations in win32, seemed to not need to be touched after they were initially used, am I right in this assumption? How did you find the learning curve, compared to other graphical api's? I am willing to learn. Also why does there seem to be a large abundance of opengl books recently and not as many dx 10/9? Why are a lot of tutorials written for dx8? Would you recommend I look at dx 10 style of doing things? Besides the sdk's documentation, is there anywhere else you looked for help? (I saw directxtutorial.com, and chad vernon). Thanks a lot. Anthony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SiS-Shadowman    359
Well, the first thing that really helps is the msdn. It's really helpful to have it locally installed or open in a browser.
If this does not help, there's also the directx documentation that ships with the SDK: extremely helpful.
IF this does not help, consult gamedev.net (but only if the other 2 resources don't help). If you're doing it in that way, the members will be grateful :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sas1992    100
I recently started learnin Directx basics.There is very little of win32 you need to know.Plus it stays the same in most of the apps.For eg creating a window,processing messages(only few lines),etc.
I would like to know the diff between Directx and Opengl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SiS-Shadowman    359
Quote:
Original post by bobsaget
Thanks, you said I did not need to know that much win32. How much do you know, and do you think it is sufficient?


Well, the only thing you need to know is how to create a window and how to start the message pump. Alot of (really alot) tutorials explain the code you need in order to do this.

You can break it down to this:

#define WINDOW_CLASS_NAME "Kernel Window"

LRESULT CALLBACK WindowProc(HWND hwnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wparam, LPARAM lparam)
{
PAINTSTRUCT ps;
HDC hdc;

switch(msg)
{
case WM_CREATE:
{
return(0);
}
break;

case WM_PAINT:
{
hdc = BeginPaint(hwnd,&ps;
EndPaint(hwnd,&ps);
return(0);
}
break;

case WM_DESTROY:
{
PostQuitMessage(0);
return(0);
}
break;

default:
break;

}
return (DefWindowProc(hwnd, msg, wparam, param));
}

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hinstance, HINSTANCE hprevinstance, LPSTR lpcmdline, int ncmdshow)
{
int screenwidth = 1024;
int screenheight = 768;

WNDCLASSEX winclass;
HWND hwnd;
MSG msg;

winclass.cbSize = sizeof(WNDCLASSEX);
winclass.style = CS_HREDRAW | CS_VREDRAW;
winclass.lpfnWndProc = WindowProc;
winclass.cbClsExtra = 0;
winclass.cbWndExtra = 0;
winclass.hInstance = hinstance;
winclass.hIcon = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION);
winclass.hCursor = LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW);
winclass.hbrBackground = (HBRUSH)GetStockObject(BLACK_BRUSH);
winclass.lpszMenuName = NULL;
winclass.lpszClassName = WINDOW_CLASS_NAME;
winclass.hIconSm = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION);

if (!RegisterClassEx(&winclass))
return(0);

if( !(hwnd = CreateWindowEx( NULL,
WINDOW_CLASS_NAME,
WINDOW_NAME,
WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW | WS_VISIBLE,
0,0,
Screenwidth,
Screenheight,
NULL,
NULL,
hinstance,
NULL ) ) )
return 0;

// You will place your initialization here
InitDirectX();

while(TRUE)
{
if(PeekMessage(&msg,NULL,0,0,PM_REMOVE))
{
if (msg.message == WM_QUIT)
break;

TranslateMessage(&msg);
DispatchMessage(&msg);
}
// This is the main function in your application
// It is responsible for updating your scene and drawing it
if( !MainRoutine() )
break;
}

// This is the place where you will place your destruction
DestroyDirectX();

return 0;
}





That is pretty much everything. Please not that this is sloppy, one can do better. I think you can find the "perfect" main loop in the FAQ section of the forum. After you're done with this, you can move on with your application.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobsaget    100
thanks for the speedy replies. So far it looks long but pretty straight forwards, I picked up win32 programming from my library and so far it looks like the former I just typed.

Why does the dx10 tutorials seem more complete then the dx9? Or is it just me. Also does anyone have trouble running http://www.win32developer.com/ it seems to have nothing to click.

[Edited by - bobsaget on October 25, 2008 4:32:12 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By povilaslt2
      Hello. I'm Programmer who is in search of 2D game project who preferably uses OpenGL and C++. You can see my projects in GitHub. Project genre doesn't matter (except MMO's :D).
    • By ZeldaFan555
      Hello, My name is Matt. I am a programmer. I mostly use Java, but can use C++ and various other languages. I'm looking for someone to partner up with for random projects, preferably using OpenGL, though I'd be open to just about anything. If you're interested you can contact me on Skype or on here, thank you!
      Skype: Mangodoor408
    • By tyhender
      Hello, my name is Mark. I'm hobby programmer. 
      So recently,I thought that it's good idea to find people to create a full 3D engine. I'm looking for people experienced in scripting 3D shaders and implementing physics into engine(game)(we are going to use the React physics engine). 
      And,ye,no money =D I'm just looking for hobbyists that will be proud of their work. If engine(or game) will have financial succes,well,then maybe =D
      Sorry for late replies.
      I mostly give more information when people PM me,but this post is REALLY short,even for me =D
      So here's few more points:
      Engine will use openGL and SDL for graphics. It will use React3D physics library for physics simulation. Engine(most probably,atleast for the first part) won't have graphical fron-end,it will be a framework . I think final engine should be enough to set up an FPS in a couple of minutes. A bit about my self:
      I've been programming for 7 years total. I learned very slowly it as "secondary interesting thing" for like 3 years, but then began to script more seriously.  My primary language is C++,which we are going to use for the engine. Yes,I did 3D graphics with physics simulation before. No, my portfolio isn't very impressive. I'm working on that No,I wasn't employed officially. If anybody need to know more PM me. 
       
    • By Zaphyk
      I am developing my engine using the OpenGL 3.3 compatibility profile. It runs as expected on my NVIDIA card and on my Intel Card however when I tried it on an AMD setup it ran 3 times worse than on the other setups. Could this be a AMD driver thing or is this probably a problem with my OGL code? Could a different code standard create such bad performance?
    • By Kjell Andersson
      I'm trying to get some legacy OpenGL code to run with a shader pipeline,
      The legacy code uses glVertexPointer(), glColorPointer(), glNormalPointer() and glTexCoordPointer() to supply the vertex information.
      I know that it should be using setVertexAttribPointer() etc to clearly define the layout but that is not an option right now since the legacy code can't be modified to that extent.
      I've got a version 330 vertex shader to somewhat work:
      #version 330 uniform mat4 osg_ModelViewProjectionMatrix; uniform mat4 osg_ModelViewMatrix; layout(location = 0) in vec4 Vertex; layout(location = 2) in vec4 Normal; // Velocity layout(location = 3) in vec3 TexCoord; // TODO: is this the right layout location? out VertexData { vec4 color; vec3 velocity; float size; } VertexOut; void main(void) { vec4 p0 = Vertex; vec4 p1 = Vertex + vec4(Normal.x, Normal.y, Normal.z, 0.0f); vec3 velocity = (osg_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * p1 - osg_ModelViewProjectionMatrix * p0).xyz; VertexOut.velocity = velocity; VertexOut.size = TexCoord.y; gl_Position = osg_ModelViewMatrix * Vertex; } What works is the Vertex and Normal information that the legacy C++ OpenGL code seem to provide in layout location 0 and 2. This is fine.
      What I'm not getting to work is the TexCoord information that is supplied by a glTexCoordPointer() call in C++.
      Question:
      What layout location is the old standard pipeline using for glTexCoordPointer()? Or is this undefined?
       
      Side note: I'm trying to get an OpenSceneGraph 3.4.0 particle system to use custom vertex, geometry and fragment shaders for rendering the particles.
  • Popular Now