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Vontae8390

Computer Engineering

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I want to get into the game industry as a game programmer. I want a computer engineer degree and NOT a computer science degree so that in case i do not like it i can switch jobs doing something else with computers. My question is how do i go about this. http://www.jsr.vccs.edu/curriculum/courses/EGR.htm Those are the engineering courses. DO i take all of them? Or just find a curriculum of computer engineering and only take the ones i need? I live in the commonwealth Virginia, and was planning on filling out financial aid and taking the courses i need , then probally my final year transfer to a university to finish up. Im kind of new at all this college stuff. Its not like i can just pick a major like in a university and i know all the courses i need lol. By the way i graduated high school and i am 18 years of age. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Quote:

I want a computer engineer degree and NOT a computer science degree so that in case i do not like it i can switch jobs doing something else with computers.


Huh? Do you mean you want a Computer Engineering/Science degree and NOT a Game Development degree?

Quote:

Those are the engineering courses. DO i take all of them?


No. You'll only take a selection of those depending on the engineering program.

Quote:
Or just find a curriculum of computer engineering and only take the ones i need?


First you need to find some colleges that you're able to attend and then look into their Computer Engineering/Science programs. Pick a couple schools you like and apply. If you're accepted into the college and into the Computer Engineering/Science major, you'll probably only end up taking some of those, perhaps depending on a particular focus within the major.

For example, I'm a Computer Science major, but there are 8 different tracks/focuses available within the major (i.e. Software Development, Networks, Databases, etc.). I chose the Software Development track, so I only take CS courses that are required for the Software Development track - not all of the CS courses.

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A lot of people finish up a lot of their courses at a community college and then transfer to a university to finish up their degree to save money. They take all of their general courses at the community college and then transfer to the university to finish up their degree requirements that relate directly to the major for the Junior and Senior year. This is a good idea if saving money is a priority.

As far as a computer engineering degree goes:

* You can take the following courses at a community college to put toward the computer engineering degree (assuming a semester based system):

Calc I, Calc II, Calc III (usually called multivariate), Diff EQ I/sometimes Diff EQ II, Physics I, II, and III, Linear Algrebra I, Discrete Math I, Chemistry I, and II, and other general electives, etc. Be sure to check with the university for exact requirements, but you will need most of the above courses.

Usually, U. S. universities will require you to take the junior and senior level major courses at the university. Also, many community colleges do not offer engineering courses. If they do, sometimes the university will allow introductory engineering courses to transfer.

Engineering Courses: sometimes a university will have many upper level engineering courses that specialize in various areas. You usually do not take them all. Often times you will take many courses in one area to fulfill a "concentration requirement" and a lesser number of engineering courses in more disparate areas in order to satisfy a "breadth requirement". Each program differs so it is a good idea to contact the engineering office and just ask.

Furthermore, it is advantageous to inquire about the university's credit transfer policy, i. e. how many credits they will transfer and for which courses, etc. One other thing of note: computer engineering students usually can take computer science courses and have them count toward the degree requirement.

** I have used the word "usually" a lot since things can differ vastly university to university.

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