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Domn

Programming in game design

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Hey everyone im still very new to programming. Im still reading and trying to learn the basics to c++. I was wondering what parts of the game are actually programming. When i look around the internet i see free sound, world editors, ect. What parts of the game are actually programming?

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The parts that actually play the sound, that load the levels into memory, that display them, that handle the user input, that run the logic behind the players, the enemies, the items, and so on.

So don't worry, there's plenty of work to do. :)

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Technically all of it is, save sound composition and image creation. These world editors you are finding are just tools people have made to ease certain areas.

There is certain parts that you dont want to have to deal with, specifically the low end driver stuff for graphics card support, and for those there is DirectX (for windows) and OpenGL (works for everything) which helps take care of that. But in the end, you still need write code to make these things work.

The best way to think of it, well, for me anyways, is that you have to take an idea for a game, and break it down into little bits, that you will eventually know how to program. Like a tilemap. What is a tilemap? Its just a grid of tiles right? Once you figure out how to programmatically represent a tile, you just make a grid of them, and you have yourself a tilemap.

These world editors each poop out a map in a certain way, and in using them, you need to learn it, and work with it. If you do it yourself, and make your own editor, you can do whatever you want.

But if your new, especially to C++ (its generally considered quite tricky to get down, some would say dont bother, I just warn it might take a bunch of time) you shouldnt be worried with much of this stuff yet anyway. Its best to start simple, really simple.

Work on something like a guess the number game. Think about what needs to happen in such a game. A number is generated, a number is gathered (player input), and the result is displayed.

After that I tried to figure out how to make a deck of cards, that could be handled like an actual deck (start in some order, be shuffled, drawn off the top etc.). All of this without graphics of course, as that complicates things.

In the end its all baby steps, its hard to explain, but just keep coding. Things should click, and you'll make bigger and bigger things, and the next thing you know, you'll end up coding something that resembles a NES game or something. And you may have ended up programming all of it yourself.

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Quote:
Original post by Domn
I was wondering what parts of the game are actually programming... What parts of the game are actually programming?

Not sure exactly what your question is. Are you asking about percentage of data on the game disc? Or are you asking about percentage of the people involved in creating the game? Or are you asking about what other jobs besides programming are involved in making games?

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Quote:
Original post by Domn
Hey everyone im still very new to programming. Im still reading and trying to learn the basics to c++. I was wondering what parts of the game are actually programming. When i look around the internet i see free sound, world editors, ect. What parts of the game are actually programming?


All of those tools you just listed, they require someone to program them, no? What if you have a need for a level data that a level editor doesn't provide? A programmer adds that ability. Captain P listed off a multitude of other things programmers cover as well.

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thanks for the info ill just keep trying to get the basics of c++ and then do all the other things.
How for have you gone? At a certain point, it's more important you stick with the language, but if you just started, consider switching over to Python or C#. It's a significantly faster pathway.

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