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Totally confused and lost

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Hello I am totally lost and confused. It is my wish to be a good indie game developer. I don't know how to start studying. I thought about this problem and I came with this solution. Please advice me if possible. 1. Theoritical knowlede 2. Game design and development 3. Knowledge of a 3D modelling software (I have 3D Studio 2009) 4. Knowledge of a painting software like Photoshop for texture making. 5. Knowledge of a game engine What do you think? Can you elaborate more in each item suggesting some books to read?

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You mention a lot of very good skills that are very relevant to making games today, however, none of them have anything to do with any of the others. As much as we all want to be the superdeveloper that can turn out successful games twice a week, doing everything ourselves, it's really not very practical. Specialization is becoming more and more important, and you will be better off becoming an expert at one thing, than being ok at everything.

Even knowledge of game engines can be way too broad. A single aspect of a game engine may be too broad. A game like Crysis might have a person devoted completely to the water effects.

The best thing for you right now would be to read about all the different things that go into games, as Tom suggested. Pick what you want to do, practice up on it a little bit, and come back if you have trouble. People tend to be a lot more willing to help people that first try to help themselves, as opposed to just hop on forums and ask to be spoon-fed what to do.

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You have formed a list of knowledge to acquire. Knowledge is one thing, but the practical application of that knowledge is another. For most people, the two go hand in hand. For example, you learn A so you create a small game B which is based on A.

It is difficult to help since you have not listed yr game programming accomplishments. Have you created simple text games? Have you created simple 2D games? Have you dabbled in some 3D stuff? Have you chosen an API and a language and begun to code trying diligently improve with each program you write?

If you have not done the above then you must if you want to design/program games.

As Mortus suggested, making the uber game is out of most people's grasp. Those games are made with well-practiced and experienced teams. But you can learn about games. You can make tetris, pacman, a platformer, maybe a simple rts, a simple fps. All those projects will serve to teach you what must go into a game.

A single person can make a quality game; maybe it won't get the wow-factor that the million dollar corporate project gets, but you can bring some fun to some people. And, this just might lead you to be a member of a quality game design outfit, if that is indeed the path you wish to traverse.

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I will tell you things about myself.

I studied C++ on my own pace in 1991 After reading Robert Lafore book "Introduction to C++" if I still remember it correctly. I contiued my study in C++ in the following years untill I became professional. In 1994, I bought a book about developing a game in C++. The game in that book was a flight simulator. In fact, I didn't understand many things in that book and I found the porocess of developing a game is complex because I had to code everything. So I forgot about games. I didn't have a job as a programmer. But this didn't stop me to develop a library for financial and accouting systems.

What brought me to the world of gaming is that I met, in 2004, an instructor that teaches Maya. He said to me that he spent 6 years self-study of books about Maya until he became a professional in his field. He showed me a demo of his works which was outstanding. He said to me that I can be a professional in any 3D modelling software if I have a strong will, an open and creative mind, and a good computer specification. He adviced me to give up if faced some difficulties even if I found no one to help me. These jewels of advice didn't make any change to me because if I modelled a character for example, how can I control it with code to run, jumb, walk, etc? In 2008, I knew about game engines and how are they used to relief developers.

I know 3D Studio 14 years ago but I didn't use it at all. For that, I am still familiar with it. But do I need to master every thing in that huge product to become a game developer? IMO, I don't but not sure.

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I bought my new computer with to following specs:
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9450 processor running at 2.66GHz,
4GB of DDR2 memory and
512MB Geforce 9800GT graphics card
31" monitor

I have also the following programs:
3D Studio 2008
Photoshop CS2
VIsual C++ 2005
I will postpone buying the game engine untill I master the above programs completely. Do you think this is a good idea?

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No one can answer that for you. I mean, know how to use a tool is one thing, knowing how to use a tool to produce something amazing is another.

It is generally best to just pick one aspect of development and work on developing your skills with it, otherwise you'll find yourself mediocre at a lot of things, master of nothing, and pretty disappointed.

Take the use of 3ds Max. With Max you can do modeling, texturing, rigging, and animation. All of these are skills that individuals spend YEARS studying and improving.

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