Sign in to follow this  
Nofootbird

Designer

Recommended Posts

zer0wolf    1022
There isn't much to add beyond reading Tom Sloper's website. I'm just going to stress that it is important to read a lot from a diversity of subjects, immerse yourself in all sorts of entertain (videogames, movies, boardgames, card games, etc), and make games!

The best way to become a better designer is to practice your craft. With tools at your disposal such as XNA, Pyglet and PyGame, Game Maker, the Source and Unreal engines, etc. it is easier than ever to bring your ideas to screen. Don't limit yourself to just videogames. though. Making boardgames and card games are great exercises as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Captain P    1092
Quote:
Original post by Nofootbird
im a college student and i wanna be a game designer,what should i going to know and to get familiar with during my college years?

What exactly do you mean with the term 'game designer'? Do you want to be a game programmer, or an artist, or a level-designer, or someone who comes up with game ideas, or someone who leads a development team to get a game done properly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Raghar    96
Quote:
Original post by Cpt Mothballs
Be familiar with maths.
It's always good to know maths.
For a designer? I never really needed maths for the position of a designer. A knowledge about computers, yes I needed it kinda. Pretty deep knowledge about programming, to know what concept is realizable and which not, I used it and it was necessary for success of the project. However math, designer, not.

On the other hand reading about 500 books or more is useful for a game designer. It's shame to see an university educated person to use only themes he learned when he was forced to read few clasic books in his school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shurcool    439
Perhaps knowing math better will allow you to think more abstractly and come up with more unique and original ideas for your game design. ;)

It never hurts to know math (ok, except sometimes, but it's still better to know it).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nofootbird    171
Quote:
Original post by Captain P
Quote:
Original post by Nofootbird
im a college student and i wanna be a game designer,what should i going to know and to get familiar with during my college years?

What exactly do you mean with the term 'game designer'? Do you want to be a game programmer, or an artist, or a level-designer, or someone who comes up with game ideas, or someone who leads a development team to get a game done properly?


i'd prefer a level-designer who i guess maybe is the one came up with the idea of the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Captain P    1092
Quote:
Original post by Nofootbird
i'd prefer a level-designer who i guess maybe is the one came up with the idea of the game.

As far as I've seen, ideas can come from anyone. A programmer comes up with an idea, an artist adds something to it, a few others brainstorm about it and come up with yet other ideas, and so on. It's often not one single idea that makes a game, but a whole serie of ideas and decisions and tweaks. Of course, it's good to have a core idea, something to focus on, but that can take some prototyping, discussing and testing to find.

When working on a game, developers will often come with suggestions, too: one of the programmers may see a more efficient way to do something, that saves development time without sacrificing too much functionality (and sometimes actually improving things). The artists may spot a way to create less art while getting the same results. The manager or designer or whoever is in charge may decide to remove a feature because it doesn't fit well with the rest of the game, replacing it with something else.


Anyway, I would definitely recommend creating some levels for existing games. Many games provide editors for free so it's often pretty easy to get started. I've done it for 8+ years and it's been a very educative time. Especially the design aspects: coming up with ideas, then building and testing them, checking if they're actually fun. Then repeating the process until you have a nicely polished level. You'll see that having ideas is one thing, but working them out into something that works is another thing entirely.

Good luck! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nofootbird    171
Quote:
Original post by Captain P
You'll see that having ideas is one thing, but working them out into something that works is another thing entirely.



More practice, i've got it.

Thanks.:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this