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Dmitriy Safro

From VB to C++

8 posts in this topic

Hello everyone, i am not a beginner to the world of computer programming, but far from being an expert! I began programming with the good old QBasic! (do to the lack of reading materials i did not find out about Subs and Function untill VB, you can imagine what the code looked like all in one page! Anyways, i welcomed VB into my world with all my heart and soul! Starting from simple Databases and Galaga clones, to fully plexed Direct3D applications (recently). I''ve been working with VB for about 5 years now, and i love it for it''s simplicity. I realized that i can produce pretty much anything i can think of, including 3D games using 100% VB6 (Mostly relying on the DirectX8 API to to all the complex calculations). Deep down inside, i know that VB, being the ONLY language i ever used (not counting QB), is not the way to go. Getting a paid possition in the gaming industry, requires TOP LEVEL technology, VB not being included. // Must learn C++ // Tryed a couple of times, but ended up rushing to open up some VB code to calm myself down I know, i know, it''s not actually that complicated. But it seems soooo distant after spending soooo much time with VB, that i can''t bring myself to put the effort in learning C++. Why can''t VB compile code that is as fast as any other language? You have a pretty low level of functionalyty, being able to do pretty much anything C++ can do. But the difference is incredible. I guess i have to start from the begginning, learning the basics that i have already learned long ago. But then again, once i get familiar with C++ syntax, it shouldn''t be that big of a problem! But then I have to learn win32, MFC, and all the other libraries without which programming in C++ can be HELL! Any suggestiones on where to start?
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I just downloaded DevC++. It''s a free Win32 compiler. Do any of you guys know this one? How is it comparing to others? Am i better of buying VC++? Or will i be ok with DevC++ for starters? Also, is it going to be harder to make DirectX applications in it? I know it has good GL support, but it seems that DX will be bitchier to set up!
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I highly recomend buying Visual C++ it''s worth the investment. Most of the free compilers are a bear to setup with DirectX and other things. Plus the majority of the industry uses Visual C++ as their IDE.
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Stick with DevC++ until you find something that it can''t do that you want to do. For console applications it is more than enough. You may want to pick up MSVC later when (if) you want to use DirectX. There may be libraries floating around for DirectX that work for DevC++, but I know for certain the Microsoft didn''t make them if they''re out there.

[Resist Windows XP''s Invasive Production Activation Technology!]
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I guess i''ll be buying MSVC++. I kinda like the way DevC++ looks, but i need to be working with DirectX cuz i don''t know OGL....... Would it be easier to write OpenGL in DevC++? (there''s alot of positive feedback from DevC++ users, claiming it''s the best free compiler) !
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I''m currently using dev-c++ to program a simple directx game. I think I found the libraries on a link from the links section on the homepage, but since it''s down right now I can''t go and check.

But don''t buy MSVC++ until you''ve given free compilers a good chance. After all, I''ve heard reports that MSVC++ is less optimising than gnu c++, which is ultimately what dev-c++ is based on.
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DevC++ uses MinGW (by default). Here''s the description from the MinGW website (I''m chopping out the unimportant parts, see mingw.org for the full thing):
quote:

MinGW is a collection of header files and import libraries that allow one to use GCC and produce native Windows32 programs that do not rely on any 3rd-party DLLs. At the basic level, MinGW is a set of include files and import libraries that allow a console-mode program to use Microsoft''s standard C runtime library MSVCRT.DLL (available on all NT systems, and on all stock Win9x after the original Windows 95 release (for which it can be installed separately)). Using this basic runtime, you can write console-mode ANSI compliant programs using GCC and use some of the extensions offered by MS C runtime, but cannot use the features provided by the Windows32 API. The next critical piece is the w32api package, which is a set of includes and import libraries to enable the use of Windows32 API, and combined with the basic runtime, you (potentially) have full access to both the C Runtime (CRT) and Windows32 API functionality. Please see the licensing information on the various pieces.



[Resist Windows XP''s Invasive Production Activation Technology!]
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If you''re just learning C, then stick to console programs until you understand the language.

Once you''ve got that down, you might want to check out C++ Builder. It has VB RAD type features for designing forms & dialogs, but you write your code in C++. Or a beginners book on MFC can get you started making dialog based GUI''s in MSVC.

Magmai Kai Holmlor
- The disgruntled & disillusioned
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