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iliak

Dungeon master, Eye of the beholder rendering how to

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It's put together from different still image parts.

Rock wall offset -1,0 from view, rock floor offset 0,-1 from view and so on.

I don't recall seeing a doc about that; it's pretty straightforward.

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Pretty much everywhere. Many books included source to do this 10 years ago. It's just a maze with a few textured quads (granted, it was a lot harder to program back then using raycasting), no need for physics, it's pretty much 2D progamming with a 3D display.

Since you haven't said anything about your programming knowledge (are you a beginner, intermediate, advanced? directx, xna, opengl, winforms, console?), here is a link to the source for Wolfenstein 3D. http://www.btinternet.com/~belowe/

If that's too advanced for you, then a good one would be Riemers XNA tutorial, they're pretty awesome. http://www.riemers.net/eng/Tutorials/xnacsharp.php

It would help more if we knew more about your skill level though.

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I'm not interrested by the source code, but mainly on how is it done.

I remember reading a book about the technology. It should display blocks from the back to the front, towards the point of view of the player. Each block was positioned on a grid of perspective.

The goal is a remake of Dungeon Master, Black Crypt in C # / OpenGL.

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If you're going with the 90 degree turns that those games have
you can get away with still images and a quite lazy technique:
draw what's furthest away first then one step closer (possibly
covering what you have drawn previously) and keep going one step
closer to the player until you've reached it.
So if you can see five steps away you draw your view in five
passes. If the machine/API you're targeting is fast enough you
don't even have to bother much with overdraw.

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The way it was done relied on a lot of mostly drawn by hands pictures put together. Unless you love doing a lot of repetitive pixel art to get that exact same look as in the old games, it would be a lot easier to simply do it in 3D now. And that way you'll be able to animate the camera, have lighting effects, etc etc.. You can still have the same good old gameplay.

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Since you're using openGL you don't have to make this very complicated.

Levels like the one in your screenshot will be very lowpoly even if they're fairly large. Just dump it in a VBO and render it. If you don't like the performance you can always add some visibility culling, but I doubt it'll be needed.
As for the "depth cue" (or whatever the proper english term is), you could play around with some black fog.

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