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Jay Taylor

Good sample library to get started

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Jay Taylor    155
Hello. Could anybody help recommend me a good "generic" core sound library to get me started? Something hopefully no more than $500USD? I know, it's not as simple as throwing some samples together and hey presto, but my background is as a composer and I want something to help me get started with my development into sound design - as the 2 areas are mostly linked within the games industry. Thanks for your help, Jay

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Kryzon    4630
I think the easier one to use is Garritan. The samples are Ok, got a nice piano. The violins are also great.

Some would recommend East West Symphonic Orchestra Silver, and I also second that.

Make sure to check and compare the instrument list of the libraries you are interested. The one with the most articulations\samples is usually the best.

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Dannthr    511
Kryzon, pay attention, G, he wants SOUND DESIGN sample libraries--or rather REAL sample libraries.

Jay, one piece of advice: I would, if I were you, AVOID production sound effects libraries--anything where the sound has been too processed. What you want, especially as a beginner, is raw SOURCE sound effects. Combine that with some kind of synthesis engine (if you have a wave editor like Sound Forge, it'll be built-in) and a wave editor and you will be well on your way to creating some decent sfx.

You will also want to look into a variety of very strange or unique Impulse Response Reverbs as they will help you not only MIX your sound effects together but also give you strange or unusual effects with which to further process your source sfx.

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Stone Lion    122
I think Kryzon was on auto reply mode, heh.

Here's something you might take a look at to Jay, but you have to watch what your getting. Sometimes they aren't in good sample rates. But as the same time it might be a nice start to building your own library.

http://filmsound.org/sound-effects/libraries.htm

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Jay Taylor    155
Quote:
Original post by Dannthr
Kryzon, pay attention, G, he wants SOUND DESIGN sample libraries--or rather REAL sample libraries.

Jay, one piece of advice: I would, if I were you, AVOID production sound effects libraries--anything where the sound has been too processed. What you want, especially as a beginner, is raw SOURCE sound effects. Combine that with some kind of synthesis engine (if you have a wave editor like Sound Forge, it'll be built-in) and a wave editor and you will be well on your way to creating some decent sfx.


I don't suppose you aware of any more raw sound libraries? Like in JP they did the Raptor sounds by combining several animals, dolphin & rhino i think from memory. It would be great to have all these kinds of samples ready to reference.

Could I not use my copy of Cubase as effectively, are tools like Sound Forge still worth the cost if I am currently running Cubase with plugins?



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Dannthr    511
You can use cubase for its multitrack layering, it can be quite nice--I have often used a video editing suite with multitrack audio to layer more complex sound environments (especially if it's to video)--but I highly recommened a wave editor like Sound Forge or what is it called? there's one for Mac, I don't recall its name. These programs allow you to edit the wave form on the bit level, Sound Forge even lets you DRAW the wave if you need something weird.

For me, I just pop the specific wave file into Sound Forge to edit and save back directly into SONAR (my multitrack audio editor).

Sound-Ideas.com has a TON of great audio sample libraries, I have the Sony Film Music Vol 1 pack, I find it useful, I've considered getting the second volume as well as many of the more exotic sound libraries with environments, etc.

Once you have a more raw wave form, you'll want to really stretch it to its limits--you'll want to really experiment with the kinds of sounds you can get out of each one.

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