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horrorgamewriter35

Horror games ..should they still be made

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I was wondering what people think of todays horror games..Should they be continued to be made or stopped all together? I would really like an honest opinion from the members of this site to tell me their views on this question. Personally I dont like the ones of today, but then again one may come along and actually be good...I hope to hear from some of you..thanks for reading this short post.

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define "should".

EA's Dead Space (horror shooter) has sold through around a million or two copies already. So from a business perspective, yes, absolutely they should be made.

Left 4 Dead (more zombie action than horror but depends on definition of horrors) preorders were 65% more than Valve's Orange box. So again business-wise absolutely they should still be made.

-me

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The reason why I asked is because I am actually writing my own horror game. And was seeing if my project was worth the trouble or not. And I mean writing as in all the details and stuff down..Not the actual coding and stuff.I am hoping to find some help in my area on this. Because I am tired of working on it alone...LOL..but anyways I do appreciate your response...thank you...

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Any game can have its points regardless of whether its genre is in the shitter. Look at Shawn of the Dead. Despite the lack of good zombie movies in recent times, or maybe because of it, that movie was great.

But, the thing that really makes a game worth it is either doing what other games have done better than previously able, or by doing something that hasn't been done before.

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I am using a few ideas that has not been done in games before..Well none that I have personally seen. I am wanting to give the players more stuff to work with, more things to work out, more stuff of everything..But I promise you now if I can get this game out. It is not going to be like other horror games of today.Which are normal mindless games where you do the same old thing.Not with my game. I am adding in features I thought would be cool..I also want to give the characters in this game more movements..and not just the same old shoot,run,shoot, run, shoot,etc. You got to give the players and characters more of a challenge as you know.But thank you for your response...I appreciate it..

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One tip. If you want to scare the player, don't give them a shotgun.

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Original post by horrorgamewriter35
..more stuff of everything..

There go my expectations.

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Not to sounds rude against your reply.But you totally avoided the question. I do accept your tip however. But please reply again but on the topic this time. I am wanting to see what the members here think about this particular topic and voice their opinion about it...In future threads please keep your replies to the actual topic and not stray from it..I am asking not telling...

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Quote:
Original post by Kest
One tip. If you want to scare the player, don't give them a shotgun.


Or a flash light.

Another tip: Surrealism, when done right and not just as an excuse for an obfuscated puzzle that has no connection to any other part of the game, is a great immersion tool.

I'm kinda writing a GDD document for a surrealistic horror game too right now, although I don't as much care if it's relevant to gamers or anyone will want to play it at this point. I keep thinking it'll be really fun if I can make the player do things that are not possible in reality, like killing your past self in order to allow your future self passed a door. Then again, I'd love to have the player do things that I frankly think would be impossible to do in games...I'm not going to go into that right now.

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Quote:
Original post by horrorgamewriter35
Not to sounds rude against your reply.But you totally avoided the question. I do accept your tip however. But please reply again but on the topic this time. I am wanting to see what the members here think about this particular topic and voice their opinion about it...In future threads please keep your replies to the actual topic and not stray from it..I am asking not telling...

So you just want us to reply directly to your topic and only directly to your topic - which is the either/or question "should horror games be continued to be made or stopped all together"? That's all you wanted to ask?

Then yes, I think horror games should continued to be made, and I don't think they should be stopped altogether.

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Quote:
Original post by horrorgamewriter35
Not to sounds rude against your reply.But you totally avoided the question. I do accept your tip however. But please reply again but on the topic this time. I am wanting to see what the members here think about this particular topic and voice their opinion about it...In future threads please keep your replies to the actual topic and not stray from it..I am asking not telling...

Sorry, I thought my tip would make my opinion obvious. Yes, I like horror. There's nothing quite like skulking around hallways with no armor and a pathetic weapon while zombies or demons are running amok.

Hence, my tip. I never seem to get frightened when I have a shotgun, regardless of the horrors that await me. That probably goes equally for machine guns, grenades, and other heavy smack down weapons. If you give the player too much authority, the fear dissipates.

I think you also need to have a serious reduction in enemy numbers, compared to typical action games. As a player, even if I am outmatched, having demons pouring out of the walls will turn my fear into gasoline. I'll just charge them. I already know I'm likely to die, so I have nothing to lose.

I think the trick is to keep the player on the edge of losing control, but without taking it away from them.

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Quote:
Original post by Kest
Quote:
Original post by horrorgamewriter35
Not to sounds rude against your reply.But you totally avoided the question. I do accept your tip however. But please reply again but on the topic this time. I am wanting to see what the members here think about this particular topic and voice their opinion about it...In future threads please keep your replies to the actual topic and not stray from it..I am asking not telling...

Sorry, I thought my tip would make my opinion obvious. Yes, I like horror. There's nothing quite like skulking around hallways with no armor and a pathetic weapon while zombies or demons are running amok.

Hence, my tip. I never seem to get frightened when I have a shotgun, regardless of the horrors that await me. That probably goes equally for machine guns, grenades, and other heavy smack down weapons. If you give the player too much authority, the fear dissipates.

I think you also need to have a serious reduction in enemy numbers, compared to typical action games. As a player, even if I am outmatched, having demons pouring out of the walls will turn my fear into gasoline. I'll just charge them. I already know I'm likely to die, so I have nothing to lose.

I think the trick is to keep the player on the edge of losing control, but without taking it away from them.


Hmmm maybe that was why FEAR was good. You had control but every once in a while they'd strip you of your control (usually with a freaky looking girl popping up into your face). The super fast enemies that disappeared and reappeared on you were insane too.

I think that normal weapons can be done well by giving them really limited ammo. If the game gives me near infinite ammo then yes I don't find that I get scared. But if I have a nice weapon with highly limited ammo then I'll tend to save it for long periods of time without using it. Once that happens (and especially if you throw in enough difficult or boss type fights) I'll be a whole lot more skittery.

I also ditto the comment about massive enemy numbers. In FEAR the last part where you are trying to escape from hordes of demons just didn't do it for me. I usually would blast a hole in them and then keep on running.

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Please define horror. Is it running around with an assault weapon shooting everything you can see (think Dead Space). Or is it something where you walk around doing puzzles only shooting enemies when you really have to (think Silent Hill)?

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Most of my fear is in anticipation. Lurking around, trying to complete the objectives, not sure where trouble might show itself. Once in a while, I'll find myself freaking out badly enough that I'll charge into a new room with my angry face on, just to get it over with.

Once I have a demon in my face, fear isn't much of an issue. I just dig in and prepare to do battle.

One thing I noticed that bothers me is when the enemies do things that are unexpected. Like one will run out of an opening, and I'll prepare to fight, and it will just run back into another opening. Now I know it's watching me from somewhere, waiting for me to become vulnerable. That sort of thing always grates on my nerves. Which is a good thing.

But yeah, I agree. Dead Space was seriously lacking in the fear department. Maybe aliens just don't scare me. Or maybe the player character was too tough. I did get a little spooked here and there, but not enough to entertain me.

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A psychological horror game would be nice. I played one called Haunting Ground that was pretty intense because you never knew where the enemies were and there was an intense level of danger - you're a teenage girl against a huge ogre and a demented millionare who traps people in stone. I think that Japanese horrors are better for the scare factor - being defenceless against huge opponents aside from your brains and fast thinking is far scarier than having an AK47 or a rocket launcher. Sure, Res Evil 4 was creepy, but it never full-on freaked me out. I'd say that fear of the unknown is the best fear to play on, as people think up horrible things if primed right.

Make them let their guard down, then as they start to relax - strike!

It'd be nice to have a combatless, supernatural-entity-less horror game, though I can imagine it would be ridiculously hard to pull off correctly. Having a dark house that's actually entirely safe and totally puzzle-based that doesn't get scary if you don't panic and start going wild, but gives out 'hallucinations' if you start to freak out - hallucinations that harm you... pure bliss to watch an unsuspecting victim play. Perhaps if you run too much, you start to attract things that make creepy noises, but never harm you? Anyway, a game that messes with the player without ever putting them in real danger would be brilliant.

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I think the first Clocktower games were pretty good (the SNES and first PSX one) Where you played a young girl and had no weapons to deal with the scissor man hunting for you.

I'm pretty much in agreement with Kest on this. Except give me a weapon and you pretty much kill the tension as it suggests the something comeing after me can be stopped, and I'll more likly get frustraited trying to do that instead of being scared.

Also a big part of fear is the unknown, so don't try to explain everything...but don't make it seem too arbitrary either. The situation the plays findsthemselves in should be compelling...Not just random things happening trying to spook them.

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Looks like this thread has turned into a genre analysis.

It seems that most game genres attempt to create a feeling of power in the player. Bad controls, poor weapons, bad camera angles all work together in a survival horror game to produce the opposite effect. While the bad controls and camera angles are usually unintentional, they're still part of the environment.

So, horror games seem to be opposite other genres. They seem to thrive on this.

I wonder if there's a way to give the player a shotgun, but still convince the player to be scared; like the shotgun is useless.

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The most Clocktower-esque game I've played in recent years has been Penumbra. It's got a really, really good feel to it, although it suffers somewhat in atmosphere due to rough visuals and a clunky interface. I think you can still find the tech demo around for free, and the game itself, at least the first episode, is around in bargain bins and worth $5.

In it, you use your mouse cursor and a rudimentary stealth system to navigate and interact with the environment. The first scene is you, lost in an arctic wilderness, finding a steel hatch with the handle encrusted with ice. You have to pick up a nearby rock and then smack it against the handle a few times to free it. It's awkward, but you're freezing to death, and your vision's blurring, and it's a more frantic gameplay sequence than most gunfights or zombie chases. Later in the game, you're stalked by mutant wolves, and if they spot you, you're pretty much doomed. Once, though, I had a hammer I'd been using to break through a boarded-up window, and I managed to knock the wolf over with a well-timed hit as it lunged at me. I ran over to it and hit it again and again as it tried to get up, and when it finally died, I was breathing hard and sweating at my PC. I've coolly stood down platoons of psychic alien ninjas, but that one freak dog flipped my wig. That experience, more than anything, made me think the game resembled a horror flick, that scene where two characters fight, and one winds up strangling the other with sweat and bloot streaking down his face, whimpering and screaming the whole time, is how I felt bludgeoning that enemy, because I knew if I stopped and he got to his feet, I'd never knock him down again.

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Yes horror games should always be made, there is to much untapped potential in the genre to stop with them now.

Quote:

It'd be nice to have a combatless, supernatural-entity-less horror game, though I can imagine it would be ridiculously hard to pull off correctly. Having a dark house that's actually entirely safe and totally puzzle-based that doesn't get scary if you don't panic and start going wild, but gives out 'hallucinations' if you start to freak out - hallucinations that harm you... pure bliss to watch an unsuspecting victim play. Perhaps if you run too much, you start to attract things that make creepy noises, but never harm you? Anyway, a game that messes with the player without ever putting them in real danger would be brilliant.


I now I'm delving into the depths of the video game void here, but does anyone else remember the 7th guest or its sequel the 11th hour. Your comment just made those games pop up from the recesses of my mind. Both of them basically fit into the description that you gave there... geez I miss playing those games lol

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