Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
size_J

Visual C++ 2003

This topic is 3550 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I use Dev C++ and Visual C++ 2008 express but was wondering is Visual C++ 2003 any better. I know that Visual C++ express 2005 does not have the windows sdk and getting that to work is no fun. I know amazon.com has the learning edition of 2003 for $35.00 dollars. I also know thatsome books seem to like 2003. thanks for any help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
1) Why you shouldn't use Dev-C++

2) And I suggest you take from the author of the article above:

Microsoft Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition is by far the best option when it comes to Windows-based IDEs; it costs nothing, allows commercial distribution of products, and is a fully featured solution including excellent debugging facilities.


What makes you think that 2003 is better than 2005, and 2005 better than 2008? [looksaround] They're all the same, except the later ones have addition features and some bug fixes. Oh, and an important note: You won't be able to open .sln files created from a later version of Visual Studio, whereas the later versions can convert the older solutions to the newer format.

Therefore, I suggest you dump Dev-C++, stick with Visual Studio 2008 Express, and never look back! [lol]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never used VC++2003 so I cannot comment about whether it's "better" in some way, but the reason that books may recommend it is because they were written when that was the most up to date version.

Unless you're a professional (which seems unlikely if you use Dev-C++) then Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition will do most everything you require (it only lacks advanced features that casual developers don't use). If you're a student then you may be able to get the Professional Edition for free anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I do not like Visual C++ 2005 because to use the windows sdk you have to do this: http://blogs.msdn.com/windowssdk/archive/2008/03/01/integrating-windows-sdk-and-vs-with-new-sdk-configuration-tool.aspx

No not a pro, system admin by trade, hobby programmer for fun.

I also do not like that project (solutions) are not backward compatible. 2005 project will not open in 2003 and 2005 project have to be converted for 2008 and not always successfully. I just want a IDE that does not seem as bloated as visual 2008 express, I do not doubt that 2008 is a good product and especially for a free one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think you'll beat Visual Studio for quality, there's not much reason not to use it on a Windows machine. I also doubt that VS2003 is significantly less bloated than VS2008. That said, I've heard good things about the Code::Blocks IDE, I'm unsure how it would compare on what you consider to be bloat. There's also Eclipse, but if bloat is your concern then perhaps stay away from that one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by size_J
I do not like Visual C++ 2005 because to use the windows sdk you have to do this: http://blogs.msdn.com/windowssdk/archive/2008/03/01/integrating-windows-sdk-and-vs-with-new-sdk-configuration-tool.aspx

No not a pro, system admin by trade, hobby programmer for fun.

A system admin should be able to follow a numbered set of instructions. Believe in yourself, man!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never really understood the concern that something is too "bloated". Given the incredible array of features made available by Visual Studio 2008 there simply is NO better product for [C++/C#/VB/ASP] development on Windows. If you're so concerned about bloat just use Notepad and GCC/VC++ Toolkit 2003. Let me know how that works out for you. Otherwise, if you want to use an IDE, use the latest version of quality software. Namely VS2008 for higher quality and Code::Blocks for the "Free Software" alternative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So I think that maybe I need to keep working with visual C++ 2008 thanks for all the help. Maybe I have been to hard on M$ especially giving good tools away for free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by dmatter
I've never used VC++2003 so I cannot comment about whether it's "better" in some way, but the reason that books may recommend it is because they were written when that was the most up to date version.

Unless you're a professional (which seems unlikely if you use Dev-C++) then Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition will do most everything you require (it only lacks advanced features that casual developers don't use). If you're a student then you may be able to get the Professional Edition for free anyway.


I have the pro version from school, and the only benefit i see is not having to have seperate ones for C++, C#, asp.net, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I run Visual Studio 2005 with Visual Assist X. I'm not sure how 2008's code completion etc is compared to how much it is improved by Visual Assist X, but for 2005 or 2003 I highly recommend that plug in.

Honestly they give the express version out for free, it's the same tool professional game studios use. If you think it is bloated you can just think of it as having room to grow because I guarantee after a month of using it regularly you'll look at the older IDE you were using and wonder how you got by.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!