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pavel989

best option for cross platform?

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Eventually, i hope to work with Java (well maybe), but i was wondering, what is the best gui, to use with python, such that (now of course XP doesnt come with any of it) i can quickly script, and simply ship off to OS X, and not have the user install anything?

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I don't program in Python, but I am a big fan of GTK+ and its C++ wrapper, gtkmm; I am sure PyGTK is a good choice. Give it a try.

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well i really was lookin at qt or gtk.

and my friend has OS X, and i tried a small python script on their computer, just to see if i can use qt, and it gave me an error about it. so i wasn't sure if it comes with the python qt modules

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Since Tk ships with Python distributions, then your best bet is using Tkinter if your goal is not having the user install anything.

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If you're only targeting OS X then I would use the Cocoa bindings. Many Mac users, myself included, are incredibly anal about having applications that fit in with their desktop environment. Almost without exception, it's easy to spot an app that wasn't made with Cocoa.

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Quote:
Original post by the_edd
Many Mac users, myself included, are incredibly anal about having applications that fit in with their desktop environment. Almost without exception, it's easy to spot an app that wasn't made with Cocoa.

As a former Mac user and mac developer back in the 68K days, this is one reason why I am glad to be gone from the platform. If you want programs, you need to accept that it will include a lot of ported stuff.

It is the second- or third-biggest reason Mac has such a small application base, even with the OS X Unix change.

I still remember the Great Debate we had on my final Mac program before I left the people who were so anal about UI consistency. Although it is nice to stick with the Mac naming scheme, it should not be a critical bug to ask "Yes/No" on a dialog box, especially when the content is coming from user-generated data and it is not possible to figure out variable verbs for the buttons.

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Quote:
Original post by frob
Quote:
Original post by the_edd
Many Mac users, myself included, are incredibly anal about having applications that fit in with their desktop environment. Almost without exception, it's easy to spot an app that wasn't made with Cocoa.

As a former Mac user and mac developer back in the 68K days, this is one reason why I am glad to be gone from the platform. If you want programs, you need to accept that it will include a lot of ported stuff.

I agree that's a perfectly valid reason not to code for the Mac. But the decision has already been made to target the platform and it's only right to be aware of platform's idioms.

Quote:

It is the second- or third-biggest reason Mac has such a small application base, even with the OS X Unix change.

I'd say the application base is pretty good, especially given the Mac's market share. I've never felt it lacking anyway, but then again you might use your machine entirely differently.

Quote:

I still remember the Great Debate we had on my final Mac program before I left the people who were so anal about UI consistency. Although it is nice to stick with the Mac naming scheme, it should not be a critical bug to ask "Yes/No" on a dialog box, especially when the content is coming from user-generated data and it is not possible to figure out variable verbs for the buttons.


Ok, I'm not *that* anal :) That is going overboard, I completely agree. What I was really referring to was the look and feel of the widgets, having a properly integrated toolbar and menu - things like that. I'd prefer an app with a native appearance and "incorrectly" labeled buttons than an app that is incorrect in both ways, though.

The main point(s) that I was trying to make:

1. Cocoa is a pretty decent framework
2. and it has very solid Python bindings.
3. The sole target platform is Mac OS
4. so there's no compelling reason to use anything else
(5. even if you don't follow the Apple UI guidelines to the letter).

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