• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Order of development

This topic is 3385 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I was wondering, is there an industry standard for the order in which each element of a game is written? For instance, in my game I have started working on the client first; specifically on drawing a map, rendering a model and then animating it. Next I will start working on the server which will allow several clients to connect and send messages to each other. Is there a "best order" I should write each part of my program in? If designing a large game, such as an MMO, what parts of the game would be coded first? ~geKingu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I doubt that the industry has a standard order of development(of course i am not in the industry so i really don't know) but i think everything would be done logical order. For instance if i was making a RPG, I would first build that system to generate and render the map, than i would work on getting model into the game, then get animation working and so on as it would not make sense to work on animation if i don't have model loading working(as have one would really help me develop the other. Now if i were to build a MMO, I would work on the server authentication login system. I would just build that game in the order of what it needed in order to build the other systems and then start from the bottom up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, more than one thing is worked on at a time, as there are almost always multiple developers. And things are worked on in such a way to minimize dependencies. Perhaps the most crucial one is for non-programmers. All tools and some basic stuff needs to be working VERY early so that all of the artists and designers can actually start doing all of the work that separates a real game from a tech demo. =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phase 1) Tools + Engine.
If these don't exist, they are built together. The key is making a minimal way for data to get into the game so everyone else on the team can start working.
This is FAR from complete (even if you go 3rd party and have something almost working to start with). Once the artists are making things in MAYA, and the programmers are seeing those things in the game everything can hit the prototype phase.

Phase 2) Prototype.
Work out the bugs inherent to jumping into production. Get some rough design specs, and quickly hash out something that looks close. This means making your player character run around. Making nav-mesh systems, state machines, and anything else you think your gameplay needs. Everyone splits the work so as many unique subsystems can be created as quickly as posible. Then things can change into more of a pipeline, where one person keeps working on the back end (now we need targeting, enemies need to 'hear' or 'see') and the other pushes forward and begins tieing systems together into working objects so gameplay can
be tested.
The whole time the engine and gameplay crew are getting feedback from everyone as to what features are still needed just to make things work (animation, textures, particle editors, in-game preview tools. etc.)

Phase 3) The game (or first demo to the publisher)
Likely still bugs and missing features. but it is too late to worry about that now, it will have to get done as you push forward. Pull together anything you need and start making the game. Everything goes concurrently. So you will have multiple people doing single items as client/server OR you will have people on the client side and people for the server side OR both. The breakdowns are more along the resource bottlenecks where I work. ie. a programmer tries to focus on one level or one character at at time so multiple people aren't fighting for the same game resources. Each engine programmer focuses on a subsystem at a time so they don't stomp on eahother.

Phase 4) Everyone panic! We have to ship.
Everyone works on anything they are familiar with (or whatever they can to balance out workloads). Any system is worked on in any order needed to fix bugs until the game is stable enough for the publisher to ok it for shipping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Start with a detailed structual design then use that to work out dependancies, usually in the form of a Gant chart via something like Microsoft Project.

When you have a list of dependancies, start working on this which don't have any dependancies then build on top of that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for all the replies! I had always made a prototype, before creating tools to make the job easier.

If I were creating a tile based game, I would have hard-coded some maps and got the prototype running, before creating a map editor for instance. I suppose it makes much more sense to write the tools first though.

~geKingu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement