Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Flo

How to build a launcher ?

Recommended Posts

Hi there, I'am planning to start creating a new game : just a bomberman-clone. Anyway, I'd like to familiarize myself with DirectPlay, in order to implement network play on my game. My problem is : I want to do a kind of "launcher", which would be a simple windows application, with just one form, on which you will be able to change the options, and to connect to, or to start a network server (and of course, to launch the game itself!). The game itself will be full-screen. My problem is : how do I "link" the launcher with the game itself? I think I should have two different executable files. For instance, I could use a function like "shellexecute" to launch the game from the launcher. But when you want to play a network game, you have to establish the connection in the launcher... And of course you have to keep the connection when you launch the game! I have thought of establishing the connection in the launcher, in order to allow players to chat and to create servers, and then, when you launch the game, I would just close the connection, and establish it again "automatically" in the game itself (for instance, the laucher could pass some parameters to the game when it executes it). But I don't know if this is a good idea, since I have never used directplay before. So I would really appreciate if you guys could give me some "tricks", or explain how you do those sorts of things in your own games! Cheers, Flo Edited by - Flo on June 23, 2001 8:50:42 AM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, MatrixCubed!

Actually, I already know how to launch external programs and to pass command lines parameters to them, using functions from the win32 api.

But I''d like to know if this is the most clean and efficient way to do the things I mentionned, especially with DirectPlay.

Cheers,

Flo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would say it is! The low level Win32 API functions seem to be the most efficient calls, function-call time-wise, because they are calling subroutines directly from kernel32/gdi32/user32 code. Anything more than that would be a slower wrapper layer.

As for the cleanest way to call these... it''s probably the safest because it lets you specify how the program should be launched, security parameters, etc. Thus it lets you design your application launcher for all modern Windows platforms.



MatrixCubed
http://MatrixCubed.org






Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites