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Does isometric have to be 2:1?

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For example, are these graphics isometric? (http://download.skype.com/share/mailings/campaigns/200712devzone/xmas.gif) ...or http://i.d.com.com/i/dl/media/dlimage/18/65/11/186511_large.jpeg It looks like they are 1:1 instead of 2:1...

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Technically, isometric tiles cannot have a width/height ratio of 2:1. The ratio actually has to be 1.732:1 for the angular properties to be preserved. What we call an "isometric" projection is actually a dimetric projection. Those images appear to be dimetric, though it's difficult to tell with the second one since it's so blurry. They certainly aren't 1:1.

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Thanks for the fast reply.

I was just reading Wikipedia and saw the same thing about dimetric projection actually being used instead of isometric projection, but I guess everybody still calls it isometric projection anyways.

What happens to tile sizes when you use a 1.732:1 ratio? I thought that you normally had tiles 64x32 (eg. 2:1 ratio) but I would think that using the other ratio that I would need different size tiles, right?

Also, here's a better picture of second image I mentioned above: http://images.betanews.com/screenshots/1210948307-1.gif

I'm guessing it's "isometric" (really dimetric) too?

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Keeping the same height: 55.424x32 (obviously you'd need to round)
Keeping the same width: 64x36.95 (basically 64x37)

I would swear I'd seen something somewhere about "true isometric tiles" being 70x40, which comes out darn close to this ratio. Can't find it right now, though...

Anyway, FWIW, 2:1 is much easier math-wise. I'm not sure using real isometric angles would be worth the extra effort.

Feel free to ignore me, as always.

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Thanks again for the help.

Can isometric be in a 1:1 ratio? If "isometric" just means "same measurements" then I'm guessing yes? ...but I'm still very confused.

Here's a tutorial I'm reading: http://www.squidi.net/devlog/oldrogue/entry003.php

...and the author is explaining how to draw isometric tiles but he is using 32x32 as his tile base. Is this really isometric (or even dimetric?)...

I'm still confused! :(

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While in technical drawing the term "isometric" has a very specific definition and meaning, in games it's usually (ab)used to mean any view where the primary world axies are displayed diagonally. Actual angles and ratios may be changed or warped so that things tessellate nicely or to fit memory and hardware constraints.

Assuming you're doing a game and not some kind of technical drawing app, then just go with whatever size and ratio works for you.

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I'm still a little bit confused...

What size should my tiles be?

32x16 doesn't seem to work. I can't draw a perfect diamond in it. However, 32x15 works fine. Is this normal?

However, most tutorials online say to 64x32 but this doesn't seem to let me use a perfect diamond either.

How are people using 64x32 and drawing perfect diamonds inside of them?

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I think I see my confusion...

The size of the entire tile image is 32x15 or 64x31. However, the tile contained inside that image is 32x16 or 64x32.

Is that right?

It's a little bit confusing because I was thinking that the image would be 32x16 or 64x32.

Do I have myself straightened out now? :)

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