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Metal Typhoon

DirectX or OpenGL ....

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I''ve posted a topic here in wich says , which is best c++ builder or vc++ ? they from that i got most of the answers vc++. K , now i''l start in vc++. For this topic now i would like to know which API is best touse in GAMES , DirectX or OpenGL. From some resources i know that OpenGL is way better than DX ,right ? So what u guys think about that ? "The shortcut is not always the best way " Metal Typhoon

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OpenGL''s future isnt 100% secure, Epic Games (Unreal makers), id Software (quake), have both announced they are going to be switching to D3D. Also nVidia is starting to move more towards direct3d then opengl. But, if opengl were to die out, it wouldnt be for a couple of years.

It comes down to preference really, check out NeHe, and NeXe (or DirectX sdk), see which programming style you like and go from there. The concepts and some of the code are very similar with the 2 api''s, so if you did pick opengl and it died out (which it probally wont any time soon), you could very easily learn d3d.

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There is little to know diffrence between OpenGL and DirectX.

DirectX:

Has input, sound, video, and other things integrated into the api along with 2d and 3d graphics interfaces.

OpenGL:

Cross platform, Graphics only.

Other than that, the only diffrence now is pretty much function names.

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I asked this same question about 2 months ago, and almost every reply I got said "it doesnt matter use what you are comfortable with". I also got "learn them both", I agree with the last statement. The future of and API is uncertain. OpenGL is going to be around for a long time still, plus if you know them both you should have no problem getting a job. Plus once you learn one the other is easy. I''ve been learning DX lately cause its in a book that i have, but I was looking at some OPenGL and it doesnt seem to entirely different. For now all I can say is pick one and go for it then learn the other.

"There is humor in everything depending on which prespective you look from."

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Neither one is better, plain and simple. As for idsfotware switching over. I dont know where you heard that, but John Carmack NEVER said he was switching over. He did say D3D is getting better but he still likes opengl better. All it boils down to is which YOU find easier to use and what suits YOUR needs. OpenGL is used in more than just games too. It was developed for applications such as medical imaging, CAD, etc. Just recently people started to use it for games. So its future is not in any harm. Also OpenGL version 1.3 is due pretty soon. (hopefully soon) Some people prefer D3D because the like OOP and COM. Some people like opengl better becasue they like the ''C'' way of doing things. Personally i use OpenGL more than D3D but the reason for that is becasue i know OpenGL better.

So my suggestion is learn a little of both. Then from there, figure out which you prefer and go with it. Also as a side note, most 3d graphics programming job applications (well for games and such i know) they usually want both. Most will say you should know one very well but if you know the other then that is a plus. So it wont hurt knowing both.

And some video card drivers work better with say D3d or they may work better with OpenGL. So if you know both and could have the opetion for both in your game, then this will satisfy the user since they can now choose the API which runs best for them.

Well thats my 2 cents.

-SirKnight

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id Software said they were going to be using d3d in their future games in a press release that came out about a month before DX8 came out.

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Well.. I don''t quite understand how OpenGL could fade away, given than it''s the only API used for 3D applications (Maya, 3DS Max, and probably AutoCAD etc).

If it is to disappear, I guess it will be replaced by another portable API, since most high end 3D workstations are SGI (and many rendering servers as well). I don''t think MS will port DX to all the Unix for all hardware platforms... So my bet is that OpenGL will either remain or be replaced by another portable API.

Metal Typhoon : I think the replies here summed it up : learn both of them. OpenGL is very easy and Direct Graphics is almost as easy.

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Ok , i''ll try to learn both of them. But here comes my question . Wich on should i learn first ? I mean if i learn Opengl first would it be easy to learn Direct3d after ? or Direct3d first and then OpenGL ?

"The shortcut is not always the best way "

Metal Typhoon

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I still dont beleive John Carmack would change from OpenGL to d3d. Give me a link that says this. The new doom engine is using OpenGL for one. Also OpenGL has a more powerfull vertex program (shaders) setup than d3d and OpenGL''s texture shaders with Regisister combiners are more powerfull than d3d''s pixel shaders. If you dont beleive me then ask the nvidia guys at the opengl.org message board. Knowing that, there is no way a guy like John would switch to d3d. I just dont buy it. I read everything that comes out of idsoftware and i would know if they were switching.

-SirKnight

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Your not going to get muchunbiased opinions from these people just use the one you find the most documentation on !

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