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mossmoss

When is iso not iso?

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mossmoss    326
As a pet project, I''d like to build a little iso engine at home. I program 3d games professionally and am tempted to build the iso engine in 3d rather than 2d. I see there are plenty of other tempted to do the same for <insert reasons here>. Given that it''s 3d, it would lessen the restrictions of putting things in "cells" or on cell borders. (Not that it''s impossible in 2d, but I suspect more difficult than 3d.) You could have items crossing cells, rotated beyond 90 or 45 degrees... heck, why have cells at all? So the question then is, when does it stop being an iso game? Is the primary factor the camera angle? Or should we limit the term "isometric engine" to strictly 2d games? Not that this really matters in the end... to me, the name is not that important. (So why''d I ask? Who knows...) To me, the camera angle is the interesting part, so that will be the primary "iso-component" that will be in my project. ---- --- -- - Blue programmer needs food badly. Blue programmer is about to die!

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KalvinB    102
Iso refers to fake 3D. Basically non perspective rotated view. Once you add actual perspective it''s not Iso.

Ben
http://therabbithole.redback.inficad.com


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TANSTAAFL    1160
a species of orthographic projection, in which but a single plane of projection is used. It is so named from the fact that the projections of three equal lines, parallel respectively to three rectangular axes, are equal to one another. This kind of projection is principally used in delineating buildings or machinery, in which the principal lines are parallel to three rectangular axes, and the principal planes are parallel to three rectangular planes passing through the three axes.


a true isometric projection requires a removal of perspective( (0,0,0,1) in the w column or row of the matrix), and a locked camera angle. once you add perspective, you then have a full 3d projection and are no longer iso. once you change the angle, you now have a different axonometric projection.

as far as this forum is concerned, however, we include other axonometric projections in our discussions of iso, since the math for each is rather similar.

basically, what we do in here is explore orthographic projections and apply tile based techniques to them.

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