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SuBM1T

So Who Makes the Most Money?

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If money is one of your top conditions I don't think you can possibly beat the financial sector, considering with a few years experience you are pulling 95+ easily, and then after a few years experience in either trading systems and/or risk management it is hard to make less than 120.

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Original post by Saruman
If money is one of your top conditions I don't think you can possibly beat the financial sector, considering with a few years experience you are pulling 95+ easily, and then after a few years experience in either trading systems and/or risk management it is hard to make less than 120.

Not to mention that if your top priority is money, then it's not a bad idea to pick a career area that revolves around that. [wink]

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You can make decent money in *any* position in games (for a given definition of decent, that is).

Going into a games position that you are passionate about is more likely to lead to better performance, and therefore more frequent and larger raises/promotions, than going into one just because it makes more money.

If you want to do art, do art. While software engineering may pay on average more money, if you're passionate about art, you'll probably do a better job, and make more money in the long run. If you hate coding, you'll probably do a poor job of it and never make much of a career of it. The minor difference in average salary is going to be offset by the passion you bring to the job.

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My uncle is a business programmer, he enjoys his work very much and is very good at it. He is not full time as far as I know but he is so good that the leader of the corporation (corporation, not company) flew up here just to talk to him. Imo as long as you like programming, any direction should be good. And I am going to assume that you can make Indie games in your off time, if you enjoy it enough.

Just my humble opinion, not saying to go with business programming just wanted to type that out. I don't see why so many people assume it so dull, one of the best parts about programming is when you make something useful or finish a project and you finished that last error and your ready to share it, and that happens a little more in business programming I assume.

anyway, back ontopic, I am going to assume the guys in charge make the most money... but aside from that, I would say the animators because they get paid quite a bit for each job and they do a LOT of jobs.

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Original post by Palidine
Quote:
Original post by SuBM1T
According to the article thats posted above programmers make 80k which is a lot in my opinion.


Depends where you live. In San Francisco / LA, you'll be comfortable but not "rich". It's also not enough to buy a house there for a few years. Also, I don't think anyone offers that as a starting salary unless you're the mac-daddy of programming. Starting engineer salaries are normally around 60-70k

And as the above poster pointed out, you can do the same thing in any other industry and get 90-100k starting salary. Not to mention that my yearly bonus in games is ~$7,000 and in web-programming it was never less than $20,000

Don't go into games for money. Go into it because you love games and are obsessed with them. No one here is in it for the money and you'll be sad every bonus season when you friends are buying shiny Lotuses [smile].

I took a 30% base pay cut and a 60% cut on my yearly bonus to work a harder job for 2x the hours because it's infinitely more fun. If that sounds crazy to you, don't go into game development.

-me


I want to know the average house price there in NewYork or other big city in US?

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Just as an example I used to work at the local compUsa as a lowley service writter part time. The job I had before that I made about 12$ an hour, the new job at comp was only 9$ an hour. A pretty hefty pay cut esp for a college student. But you know what? I had to put up with rude dumb customers day in and day out and i didn't care at all, didn't care if we had to stay 2 or 3 hours past my scheduled time off because i loved the job. The store closed when they got sold off and condensed down and so i had to find another job. I don't hate my current job but it's far better than working where I was, staples, after comp closed. Morale/point of the story? No one job in the industry pays very well simply put. You just have to find something you enjoy and do it. No real part of the job you do in the game industry will pay more than another and if they do as the article posted right off the bat stated will specifcally pay more really. And only wanted to prove a point on the pay versus job liking. Sometimes you get lucky and get a job that pays well and isn't one where you have to work with or be a jerk at.

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Wow, when did I ever say money was a motive. Never. I said these were my reasons:

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Original post by SuBM1T
Oh I see. Yes I love playing and critquing video games and I want to be an innovator in the game industry.


Quote:
Original post by SuBM1T
If you would have read the ealier posts I stated that I am a gamer and aspiring to work in the game industry. I never said money was an incentive, I just wanted to the know the differences of salaries among different positions in game development.




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It is rather implied by the thread topic. It could've been 'Salary info?', or 'What positions exist in the Industry?', or 'What's your salary?', or even 'What's the difference in salary versus biz-dev?'.

You chose none of those.

Maybe we're reading too much into it, but I personally would expect less defensiveness and more questions about what each position actually does if that were the case (or really any career questions that don't involve salary).

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My question was answered with the article that was posted in one of the earlier replies. I'm only being defensive because most of you are just repeating one another and thus prolonging the discussion of this thread which is going off topic.

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Quote:
Original post by Saruman
If money is one of your top conditions I don't think you can possibly beat the financial sector, considering with a few years experience you are pulling 95+ easily, and then after a few years experience in either trading systems and/or risk management it is hard to make less than 120.

I would suggest strategic business development lead in an international oil company. That should bring you into the $1m per year sector.

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Original post by SuBM1T
Oh I see. Yes I love playing and critquing video games and I want to be an innovator in the game industry.


Well to put it simply you may have to sacrifice the best paying job in the field to do this. Why? Becuase what you love to do may not be the best paying part of game desing. Also, you want to find something that is related to the field of game design you are good at becuase this in turn will help you find ways to innovate it. So I guess what I'm trying to say is look at what you are both good at and love, if your not good at it work at till you are just make sure you love it and an easy test is if you don't care what you make then you will love it.

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There is nothing to be implied from what he said:
Quote:
Which position in game development earns the most income?

If so, it's likely it was assumed the post MEANT something else because of past experiences/bias. (E.g Some beginners look into the game industry because they think it pays well, etc) I digress.

The simple answer: the top people of that development studio*; founders, presidents, CEO, etc and the top developers within the inner circle.


*Of course their pay may vary based on their studio size and net income.




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