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masterconjurer

Creating an FPS. What's needed?

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Ok, I want to make a First Person Shooter like Doom or Quake. Here is the list of software I have available for use on this game: * Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 * Maya 3D (Runs on Windows NT, which I don''t have) * Genesis 3D SDK * Shadow Realm Model Animator * DirectX 7 SDK Is there anything else I need to make an FPS? Also, could someone tell me where I could get a tutorial or something about creating FPS games? All help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks. Master Conjurer

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That''s a big question

First and foremost I''d work on getting the core engine..if you''re wanting something along the lines of Doom/Quake, you should look into how BSP trees work..Doom uses a 2d BSP, Quake uses a 3D(that''s why walls in Doom are always vertical, no slanted planes possible)..

There''s alot of info here on gamedev about bsp trees and other options for the core engine..don''t forget about all the fun extras like movement, collision detection, sound, etc...it''s not just about processing visible geometry..

Once you have an engine that handles all your needs, you''ll have to worry about actually getting the art content into it..you may end up having to write your own file format, and convert data to it..

Assuming you have an engine and can load all geometry content, sounds, textures, special objects(triggers, moving objects, etc.)then you can begin creating environments..not ready for a full game, but at this point you can start designing the overall look and feel..

Assuming you have designed/created some fun environments to play in, you now have to add enemies. That involves lots of fun stuff like artificial intelligence, animation code, etc. Let''s not even go there right now

Good design and artwork are the most important(the world has seen enough quake clones), BUT without the core technology to drive these things your vision will never be realized..

At the very least you should have a basic graphic application that allows you to preview environments in some meaningful way..even if you''re not running fast enough for production, a slow engine for testing is better than no engine at all..

If your next question is "How do I write a 3D engine?" I''d recommend The Black Art Of 3D Game Programming..it covers writing a 3d game from the ground up..


"Like all good things, it starts with a monkey.."

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err my advice for nthe gameplay aspects are

NO aliens
NO space
NO Future
NO conspiracy shit cos its old
GOOD Guns
NO lasers
Ability to lie down
Historical Accuracy
and REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM
REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM
REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM REALISM

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Thanks for your posts! About the engine your talking about, what do I have to do that will make an engine for my game? Also, as soon as I get everything I need, i''m going to begin a design document. Then once I have EVERYTHING layed out and set, the game will begin!

master conjurer

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Guest Anonymous Poster
time for a dose of reality buddy: you''re never going to finish. Start small. When you think you''re ready try something medium sized. Then and only then consider trying something big. I''m try to help, not flame. Here''s how you know if you''re ready to do a project: you already know how to do it and you don''t need to get help except for a few minor details. Actually that''s a bit optimistic, some would argue that you''re not ready until you have it mostly programmed in your head. Oh and don''t lay everything out before starting, you''ll find that most of your work ends up wasted when you inevitably have to start over.

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