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Programming Portfolio Website

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www.dbarnhart.ca I've updated my portfolio website with my new projects relating to concurrency, shaders, project planning and so on. If you find any errors or issues, please let me now. Hopefully, you will find it interesting. :) I'm also looking for a summer internship from the start of May to the start of September. The Toronto area is preferable, but I am willing to travel. Darryl Barnhart

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This isn't very professional looking. If this is a portfolio website you will be showing to prospective employers, the website needs to use the same tone you would use in an interview.

That means get rid of the emoticons, get rid of the "disclaimer" that your code might not work, get rid of all the programming projects that don't work. The disclaimer makes it look like you aren't confident that your code will run as expected in the environment you say it should work for. That is the exact opposite thing you want potential employers to think of you.

The website overall is a bit too plain for my tastes.

When you click on one of the menu links, a VERY annoying dotted line appears around the menu choice.

I wouldn't put "this website" on the list of your projects.

EDIT:
In the contact tab, all the links on the right, under the big bold "contact" don't do anything.

Under "about", you need to get rid of the "Don't I sound awesome in third person :p".

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Why is your "portfolio site" laid out like a blog? News, Updates... Website launched in 2007?!

Here is a highly effective "landing" or "presence" page, which leads you to the various ways this person presents himself online. Here is his projects page, from his main site - the front page of which is his blog.

For a portfolio site, get to the point, quickly. Show your best work, and don't try to be too flip or quirky - the interest is in your work, first, as a means of qualifying you. Don't distract people from how good it is. (It is good, right...?)

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I've incorperated your suggestions. Thanks for the input.

I tossed the entire about section, it seemed superfluous. Everything relavent to employment is present elsewhere. If they want to get to know me personally, they can always call me or bring me in for an interview.

I also tossed the entire news section, replacing it with "Featured Projects", since it is not a blog as you say. fyi, I did first write the site in December of 2007, so that's why that was there. However, I didn't get an actual domain until recently. Not that any of that matters now.

MortusMaximus: Those are anchor links. They do work if you are viewing the website with a narrow window. I know not all the pages need a side menu, but some do and I'd rather be consistant everywhere. And yes, it's rather plain, but that's an intentional stylistic choice.

Also, I can't replicate this dotted line you speak of. Can you give me more details? Perhaps you are referring to the dotted line the browser generates when you click a link? I'm not sure how I can get rid of that.

Finally, I am not and have no intentions to ever be a web developer. However, I think it would be inappropriate to hire someone else to make my portfolio. So I expect there to be some issues.

[Edited by - DudeMiester on April 19, 2009 9:36:37 PM]

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Yes, those are the dotted lines to which I was referring. You can get rid of them if you use javascript and dhtml to make your page, instead of dreamweaver ;) It will also get rid of when you hold down the mouse button over an image, and it will move along with the mouse cursor.

I'm a web-programmer, so it kind of bugs me to see those dotted lines, because it seems like a lack of effort went into making the page, especially if you want to be a programmer, and list javascript as one of the languages you know (!).

If you don't want to be a web-programmer, you might want to take all the web-related stuff out of the "skills" heading. You shouldn't list skills that you wouldn't be willing to use in the workplace.

Also, I took another look, and you have MS Office listed under operating systems?...

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Source code is unnecessary. People visiting your site might click binaries, but not employers. So its an option to leave those up. But you should have some pictures or videos of the projects. My page is just a quick 4 minute demo reel of tons of games and projects I have worked on. It condenses my stuff to just the front page and a demo reel. Any in-depth stuff is just on other pages.

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From a quick look there is a lot of text and very few images. Also I had very hard time finding the completed projects.

> May not compile or run at all.
Then why is it online? I like to keep my completed projects in my portfolio and have a wip section for stuff that I want to show, but that are unfinished.

A frontpage that I like is this one. Straight to the point, and I can get a quick overview of each of his projects without reading a lot of text.

> Here is a highly effective "landing" or "presence" page
I couldn't see any of his links unless I had my cheek on the desktop and facing slightly up towards my monitor or went into paint.net and darkened the image by 50. Good looking site though :)

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Quote:
Original post by MortusMaximus
Yes, those are the dotted lines to which I was referring. You can get rid of them if you use javascript and dhtml to make your page, instead of dreamweaver ;) It will also get rid of when you hold down the mouse button over an image, and it will move along with the mouse cursor.

I'm a web-programmer, so it kind of bugs me to see those dotted lines, because it seems like a lack of effort went into making the page, especially if you want to be a programmer, and list javascript as one of the languages you know (!).

Well, they're gone now with a simple CSS "outline:none;" Thanks for pointing it out.

Quote:
If you don't want to be a web-programmer, you might want to take all the web-related stuff out of the "skills" heading. You shouldn't list skills that you wouldn't be willing to use in the workplace.

I'm not unwilling to use them. I am fairly proficient with them, so I put them on. That doesn't mean I know the ins and outs of actually creating complex websites, but I can use the tools. Perhaps I need to clarify this somehow, any ideas? I could always remove them from the list like you say.

I mean, it's not like I couldn't learn web development in more depth. I could definately if I put in the time, but I would rather focus on other areas.

Quote:
Also, I took another look, and you have MS Office listed under operating systems?...

Wow! I don't know how that happened. One second...

Quote:
Original post by sirGustav
From a quick look there is a lot of text and very few images. Also I had very hard time finding the completed projects.

> May not compile or run at all.
Then why is it online? I like to keep my completed projects in my portfolio and have a wip section for stuff that I want to show, but that are unfinished.

A frontpage that I like is this one. Straight to the point, and I can get a quick overview of each of his projects without reading a lot of text.

I've been told by a few professionals in my area that putting work in progress code is good, because it shows how you work. However, I will note your thoughts, and try to make it more obvious what is WIP and what is not. I just wanted to give employers an idea of what I'm working on right now, but perhaps there is a better way?

I know what you mean about preview images. I didn't realize it was so important, however. I will add those soon.

Quote:
Original post by dpadam450
Source code is unnecessary. People visiting your site might click binaries, but not employers. So its an option to leave those up. But you should have some pictures or videos of the projects. My page is just a quick 4 minute demo reel of tons of games and projects I have worked on. It condenses my stuff to just the front page and a demo reel. Any in-depth stuff is just on other pages.

I see how this ties into what sirGustav said. I'll do my best to come up with something more pictoral. It's just most of my code is non-visual, but maybe I can do some kind of chart, graph or figure.

Also, I have a number of friends who want to read my source code, so I think I'll leave it up. I don't see that it's a detriment, even if it's unnecessary.

Again, thank you to everyone for your comments.

[Edited by - DudeMiester on April 20, 2009 12:51:57 AM]

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Quote:
Original post by DudeMiester
I'm not unwilling to use them. I am fairly proficient with them, so I put them on. That doesn't mean I know the ins and outs of actually creating complex websites, but I can use the tools. Perhaps I need to clarify this somehow, any ideas? I could always remove them from the list like you say.

I mean, it's not like I couldn't learn web development in more depth. I could definately if I put in the time, but I would rather focus on other areas.



Well, like you said, you'd rather focus on different things. A programmer doesn't have to know every language out there, and you're not expected to put every language you've ever touched on your resume. Of course, the opinions on this vary, but I would rather see people put only the languages they are very familiar with, and use on a regular basis, than every one they have ever touched... otherwise, you get EVERYONE putting down all the good language buzzwords, and it's difficult to tell who is actually a javascript, or php, or lisp, or whatever programmer.

You might consider dividing things into multiple sections, such as "Extremely proficient with: C++, Java, C#. Also familiar with: javascript, scheme, lisp, php, blah blah". That way the prospective employer knows what to have you be doing most of the time, but also what you CAN do in a pinch should the need arise.

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Quote:
Original post by MortusMaximus
Well, like you said, you'd rather focus on different things. A programmer doesn't have to know every language out there, and you're not expected to put every language you've ever touched on your resume. Of course, the opinions on this vary, but I would rather see people put only the languages they are very familiar with, and use on a regular basis, than every one they have ever touched... otherwise, you get EVERYONE putting down all the good language buzzwords, and it's difficult to tell who is actually a javascript, or php, or lisp, or whatever programmer.

You might consider dividing things into multiple sections, such as "Extremely proficient with: C++, Java, C#. Also familiar with: javascript, scheme, lisp, php, blah blah". That way the prospective employer knows what to have you be doing most of the time, but also what you CAN do in a pinch should the need arise.


I actually agree with you about the latter point, and in fact that's how my resume was written before, but I was advised against it. However, I do feel for what I have listed I could perform just fine in an entry level position with all those technologies. I mean, if I did get a job for complex web development, the learning curve would not be very steep for me. For other employers I think it makes me look well rounded.

I just got some very positive comments from an individual at Next Level Games on another forum, so I must be doing something right. *sigh of relief*

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