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10boohee

skills and the books

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i have currently signed up for calc in highschool and have gotten an ify grasp of c++ what skills and books should i pick up now to get to my goal of game programming

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If you want to use C++ to develop games, it is necessary that you know it well. Attempting to make any large project with poor coding skills is not recommended. If you don't care which language you use (and if you haven't yet invested a great deal of time in C++) you may wish to try another language. Python and C# are often recommended for beginners.

I cannot personally vouch for Python, but I know from experience that C# is a very capable language and is not terribly difficult to learn, especially if you've done some programming in the past.

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Calculus really has nothing to do with this.

C++ isn't a great first choice for a programming language. How long have you been working with it? If it's anything less than a month I'd strongly suggest considering something like Python as an alternative, for a number of reasons -- perhaps the most illustrative being that you're likely to get to your goal of programming games (interesting games, at least) much sooner than with C++.

The Python website has everything you'll need to get started.

If you have been using C++ for a while or refuse to switch, for whatever (perhaps misguided) reasons, you should Google around for "Thinking in C++" and "C++ A Dialog," which are free online books aimed at learning the language. When you've worked your way through one or both of those, you can think about moving on to more interesting projects.

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when it comes to pro programming though you have to know c++ right (just figured id do it and get it out of the way)

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Quote:
Original post by 10boohee
when it comes to pro programming though you have to know c++ right (just figured id do it and get it out of the way)


When it comes to pro programming you're going to need familiarity with a handful of languages. Might as well start with one you'll learn to some mastery faster so you can learn any other language much much faster.

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Quote:
Original post by 10boohee
when it comes to pro programming though you have to know c++ right (just figured id do it and get it out of the way)


They're recommending you a language like Python because for a beginner, it will be much easier for you to grasp the concepts of programming with a language like this versus a language like C++ for many reasons.

As Lithos said, to be considered a "Pro Programmer" you'd have to be proficient with multiple languages. C++ isn't something you'd just get out of the way. But yes, if you want to make games someday (depending on which kind), learning C++ will most likely be necessary at some point. Don't get me wrong is isn't essential depending on what kind of games you want to make. Python would be capable of making a game.

I take it you meant pro because that is the industry standard at the moment. Most major companies in the industry program their games with C++, but they don't have to. There are of course many good reasons why they are. Don't feel you have to learn C++ (just yet at least). If you feel it is right to learn C++ then go for it, I just hope you stick with it if it's what you really want because that is what is most important - sticking with a language and learning it.

Good luck in whatever you decide.

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hm i see ive checked out python but in actuality im really comfortable and like using c++ i like the implementation of cin and cout so what other languages might i want to get a firm grasp of?

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Be careful with your choice of words. I find it quite unlikely that you "like the implementation of cin and cout" because I find it quite unlikely that you could actually tell me how cin and cout are implemented on your system, especially given the forum in which you are posting.

You probably meant to say that you like the way you use cin and cout; this is known as the interface of cin and cout, which is distinctly different from their implementation, which has much more to do with their internal guts and machinery, which is generally not part of the beginners C++ curriculum (if ever).

I find it curious that you are rejecting and/or favoring a language purely over its canonical standard input/output interface. In practice, non-trivial production code (like, for example, code for those 'pro games') will never once make use of cin or cout. It is an extremely superficial and useless thing to be basing your assessment on.

That said, C# is another language worth looking at. You might prefer it over Python because it has a more C-like block structure to its syntax. Additionally, taking a look at functional languages like Haskell or Lisp is always an excellent way to broaden your programming horizons.

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hm alright c# then is probably where i should look next and with python is it really worth learning i mean is it useful in a professional programming enviroment

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