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arwez

Help the NEWBIES!!

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You should check out the old book Tricks of the game programming gurus, it gives you more info than you realy need for dos based programming...
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I just skipped DOS and frankly I found it a lot easier to program using DirectX. I started programming a little in DOS, only to realize that I already knew all the C++ and stuff to program in Windows. Learning DOS would be pointless. So, I started learning DirectX and Windows programming. I learned the basics from the internet, but I couldn't have put it all together without Windows Game Programming For Dummies. Anyway, if you don't know C++ yet then get a book on that because you will constantly want to refer to it for basic syntax when you're starting out. I got Sam's Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days, but I have some other C++ references.
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Yep I agree

Use the power of directX and create games easier. Why re-invent the wheel by trying to write ( the next best thing ) a game in Dos when you can write it in windows ( the standard ), DirectX is much easier to understand and you would be keeping up with technology, not falling behind with dos.

As for arrays and stuff, try going through a C++ teach yourself book, it really is not that bad, you have to start at the beginning.

Anyway good luck and have fun

------------------
Erick

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I would agree with the above. Skip DOS and go with Windows and DirectX. Those old days are behind us and while DirectX certainly has its faults, it is not a bad environment. I think you will find Direct Draw easy to pick and use in a simple tile based game. Inside DirectX and High Performance Windows Graphics Programming was what I used to learn Direct Draw and both are decent books and a good starting point for non-3D use of DirectX. Another good C++ title that is not mentioned is C++ How to Program by Dietel/Dietel. For C++, that book simply rocks.

Good Luck :-)

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One advantage of DOS that many people over-look is that when it crashes it's usually because you're because you screwed up. Admittedly if you screw up you usually screw up big time if you're doing anything low level. I can't tell you how many times I've ended up debugging when the problem was an undocumented Win32 API bug. There's also a book something like the Black Magic of Game Programming for DOS that is very good for DOS programming. It has blits and different video modes, etc.
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I'm not trying to dis DOS. I do a lot of coding for the UNIX side, and I have always admired the efficiency and simplicity by which it works.

But, like or not, at least for the near future Windows is the game platform to be in. While true, it is not always easy, it has some pluses too so don't write it off too quickly. Just like any platform or tool after working with it for a while you get used to the quirks and besides its always wise to stay up to date regardless.

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Of course any production level game should have Win32 as one of its target platforms, but for learning purposes it's worth it to try programming when you aren't insulated from the low level details. Everyone should try programming bitblits or a z-buffer by hand at least once.
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That I do agree with. Experience with lower level programming certainly pays off when you venture in to the higher level stuff.
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I am really tired of search the net on programming a tile based game with C++ in DOS. All the tutorials and info is useless to me. I need help now. Right from the beginning. About the arrays and blitting and crap. I am very confused! Be very detailed please. All the header files and stuff.
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Yes I agree with going strait to directX. The first game programming book I bought was LaMothes Tricks of the Game Programming Gurus it was all for dos. I did not understand it at all. I now program for windows with directX and am comming along well
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