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Started DX10 - I'm hopeless at the maths!

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Hi, I've decided to start 'messing' with DX10, obviously I'm running VISTA and now got a decent GFX card that supports DX10 ( Shader Model 4.1 ). Ok, I've been a software developer for around 18 years now, mainly C++ and last few years managed code ( C#.net ). I don't have much problem with coding, my issues lie with the maths :-( I've not done much since leaving college and at uni on my computer degree the math was very basic but that was ten years ago now. Am I going to struggle with DX if my math isn't that great? I can do the basics like matrix math, cross prod, dot prod, normalisation etc, but some of the math I've seen looks very scarey! Anybody else in this position? I.e. good at coding but not so strong with the maths? Thanks, Steve

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yeah, it took me a few years to catch up with the math. I had to take a linear algebra course.. that's what "clicked-it" for me. I wrote my own software based 3D engine as a project for that course.

Hang in there, it will all come back. I think knowing linear algebra is already a good start.

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Thanks,

It is just that when I see stuff like cos, sin to do such things as rotation, my mind just goes blank. I've been going through some of the math in Frank Luna's latest DX10 book and to be honest, that goes over my head. I just want to code some simple games with DX10 :-(

Regards,
Steve

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Hi,

Well, I use to know a bit about quaternions and inverse matrix from what I'd read in books a while back - although now forgot.

I can do simple trig, but when it comes to the trig to say rotate a point in space, then I just don't get it, I can use the D3DX rotation functions, but just curious as to how it all works. Anybody got a simple explanation of rotation?

Thanks,
Steve

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If you're interested in learning linear algebra, the MIT OpenCourseWare site has an intro to linear algebra (and matrix theory) with video lectures. Link. Some of the text book chapters are posted too. It's rather academic, and not focused on game development, but it should give you a good introduction.

--Buzzy

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What university gives a computer science degree without requiring linear algebra, trig, and some form of "numbers look like this in your computer" courses? Hell I had to take up through Calculus 2 and 3 was required if I didn't take a different math course to replace it.

I had enough math courses to get a math minor for free when I was done.

I understand it all gets forgotten though. I can't remember a lick of calculus. I do remember enough vocabulary to google things though. Some of it just doesn't make sense anymore, after you forget the 6 pages of formulas you used to have memorized.

I'd recommend just going to the used book store and working the homeworks in a linear algebra book until it is all nice and refreshed. You might need a tiny bit of trig too, but memorizing the unit circle along with the 6 trig functions place on it is enough. It isn't hard, it is just stuff we forgot.

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Hi,

I did calculus at college before going to uni, the math at uni was simple compared to some of the computer graphic math I see in text books.

I've got a couple of links to math sites, will start to look at them and thanks about the unit circle ans trig stuff :-)

Regards,
Steve

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