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Graphics Designer Question

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I'm looking to develop and hone my skills but I have a few questions standing in the way. Just to clear up terminology A Graphics Designers is the one who creates 2D and 3D content correct? If this is right then who animates and places this content in the game? Usually I do both but on a live design team I wouldn't know what its title would be. Of all the different aspects of game design I think I enjoy creating and animating 3D models and figures more then coding and such so I'm hoping to get a led on what path i need to take

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A "graphics designer" doesn't exist in my experience.

A "graphic designer" is someone who maybe does some 2d illustration, but mostly composites graphics and text to make 2D designs, such as web-pages, user interfaces, magazines, brochures, etc...

Some other titles might be:
Illustrator: 2D art
Modeller: 3D art (often specialising in characters or environments)
Animator: 3D rigging and animation, or 2D animations.
Level designer: Sometimes this means Environment Modeller, sometimes it's more of a paper game-designy thing.
Artist: Modeller, Illustrator, Graphic Artist or Animator

[EDIT]
This page might help: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphic_design_occupations

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Quote:
Original post by Hodgman
A "graphics designer" doesn't exist in my experience.

A "graphic designer" is someone who maybe does some 2d illustration, but mostly composites graphics and text to make 2D designs, such as web-pages, user interfaces, magazines, brochures, etc...

Which shows that they DO exist. (^_^) But you're right that the title isn't commonly used in the video game development/production studio (so much as in the marketing department).

The list given above omits the texture artist. The answer to the OP's questions, then, are:
1. No, it's not.
2. "Animator."

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Thank you both
your comments were exactly want i needed to hear.
So i guess i would look at myself as modeler/animator.
I'm not really a big fan of textureing

Something tells me no matter how many different roads I try to take to become a proficient Modeler or animator all of them are going to eventually lead to me having to learn all of 3D Studio Max witch makes my happy easy to use Poser obsolete.

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Quote:
Original post by chronocalamity
...witch makes my happy easy to use Poser obsolete.

You probably learned a lot using that program, no?
It's not "obsolete" -- it served its usefulness for you.
You just need to learn more tools now.

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Quote:
Original post by chronocalamity
Thank you both
your comments were exactly want i needed to hear.
So i guess i would look at myself as modeler/animator.
I'm not really a big fan of textureing

Something tells me no matter how many different roads I try to take to become a proficient Modeler or animator all of them are going to eventually lead to me having to learn all of 3D Studio Max witch makes my happy easy to use Poser obsolete.


If your going to go through learning the modeling and animating aspect of the 3D workflow I suggest that you learn how to texture. Most if not all professional 3D artist know how to at the least model and texture their art assets. To skip texturing just because you your not a big fan isn't a very good idea, when you go to get a job the guy with the portfolio with the completed models that were completely made by you will look a lot better than the incomplete models completely by you or the complete models not made by you. Don't get me wrong, whoever is best at the job specified will be more likely the get the job. But their will be people who are as good as you are in modeling, rigging, and animating that can also texture and when that happens the other guy will get the job.

If you never work with texture you most likely won't understand the best way to model and rig your models so there isn't any noticeable stretching in the characters when they move. Not to mention the fact that texturing isn't too much of a hassle, especially with the resources for learning how to texture decently right there on the internet.

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