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blade5

ok so im' a bit new

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So I have been doing some researching on good c++ books to get. After some research I found a lot of positive responses to Sams teach yourself c++ one hour a day (obviously i'm ignoring the 1 hour a day part as most people do). So I should get it at the end of the week. More of my question is I guess is do most noobs at programming read the whole book? (I would imagine so). I have read some people just get it for a reference which kind of confuses me. Sorry if this is too confusing of a question hope its not!

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In my experience I've found that it's generally best to read and try to understand the entire book. I've also found that although I could follow the material, I didn't fully realise just where to use all the concepts I'd learned and that just came with experience. So it is worth reading everything imo, but alot will jsut come with experience and you will msot likely be coming back and using your books for refernce. I've been programming for around 2 1/2 years now, which I know isn't that long, but more than enough to get all the basics down, but I still go back to some of my early c++ books occasionally for reference.

Also, I've heard great things about the Sams books too. My brother used to have one and always said how great it was!

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I kinda hate it when people give beginners advice like that :S, what makes you think that learning those languages will help them understand? I mean I went straight for C++ and did fine...

I recommend you just go with C++... but give it time and don't rush... if you don't understand a concept go online and do research on multiple sites that have tutorials for it, after a while you should be able to atleast understand the basics I believe.

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Quote:
Original post by VirtualProgrammer
I kinda hate it when people give beginners advice like that :S, what makes you think that learning those languages will help them understand? I mean I went straight for C++ and did fine...
That's alright, it is quite an opinionated thing really and there is no 'one language fits all' for beginners, someone like yourself might well do perfectly fine with C++ as a first language.

In the general case though, the important goal is learning how to program at a high level and C++ omits, obfuscates or otherwise complicates a lot of these concepts behind programming - all of which serve to impede someone from reaching that goal.

Languages like Python, C# and Java are all higher-level languages that are easier to use and enable higher productivity.

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Quote:
Original post by VirtualProgrammer
Hmm, I seem to have anoyyed you... I'm sorry man :( I didn't mean to.
Oh no, you haven't at all - what you asked was a perfectly valid question because on the face of it there might not be a clear reason why language A is any better or worse than language B, so I wanted to explain my reasoning behind my previous recommendation.

I can be quite blunt, but please don't confuse that for grumpiness or annoyance [smile]

Edit: After re-reading my previous post I don't even think it sounds like I'm annoyed, but then I guess I'm biased. [wink]

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Well I have went into C++ before but the book just wasn't that good at explaining certain things so I decided to get a new one.

In school they are teaching Java but I just don't find it that great and from what I have learned from c++ that I understand I like it more then Java.

Thanks for the responses so far!

I do have 1 more question to clarify something.

When you use a book for reference do you just go back and read certian sections? or just a paragraph to refresh your memory of something? A good example would be great for me as I don't quiet understand it. Do game programmers use references alot? (like ones that work for EA or something like that).

Thanks in advance for the response!

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dmatter: OK then sorry for the mis-understanding :D, everything comes down to the viewer's perception right :), and well looking for emotion in text is a little hard... I happened to pick up "anoyyed" :).

blade5: Hmm, well a programmer is a programmer no matter where he or she works :). If EA game programmers didn't use references they're either A) Robots or B) Humans from the future... both of which cases seem highly improbable, although B) would be a fun group to hang out with... hehe :D. Seriously though of course they use references, and when it comes to "how much" of a reference one needs to read is relative meaning that people or programmers in this case just read how much they need to. I personally have been using quite a lot of reference material as its been a while since I programmed at all. By reference material I am referring to MSDN, as well as various EBooks and what not.

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Quote:
Original post by blade5
In school they are teaching Java but I just don't find it that great and from what I have learned from c++ that I understand I like it more then Java.
Personally I don't like Java much either; my favourite language at the moment is C# and I consider it an "improved Java" in terms of the language itself.

Quote:
When you use a book for reference do you just go back and read certian sections? or just a paragraph to refresh your memory of something?
Both, or neither; it depends on what you want to find out, it might be that you know a book has a chapter on something you'd like a refresher on, or it might be that you remember a book has a clever line of code somewhere that you'd like to see again.

Quote:
Do game programmers use references alot? (like ones that work for EA or something like that).
All programmers use references all the time, people tend to dive right in, look up the things they need to look up, and just let the practice slowly settle in so that they can eventually do it off by heart - depending on the complexity of the task it might be a "do it once, know it forever" type thing, or something that they always end up needing to look up.

I tend to turn to the internet first, rather than books, mainly because it's right infront of me and the required book isn't.

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I would image the People at EA still need a reference now and then you never really stop needing one i think especially with C++ since there is a lot to it but its not C++ Syntax that you are likely to reference more so the library you may be using.

Regards Jouei.

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Ah thanks so you gusy think they generally use references for like certain what would you say? Sorry for the questions just a curiosity thing.

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EVERYTHING! :D. Seriously... probably not for extreme basics like how to create a window because when you're a professional you tend to be able to do that from memory, I know how to :) but only recently learned how... long story. The basic story is that when people are learning how to program they usually just find out how to use a function and memorise its uses and when the need arises to use the function they go to their reference and check out the parameters and what not... in some cases people just forget the parameters and need a reference which seems to be the most common use for a reference... seeing as how I usually use references for the same reason.

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oh ok thank you. I figured most people that used c++ that to know it you have to know everything by heart :P.

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Quote:
Original post by dmatter
Most people only stop learning C++ if they decide to stop using it.


QFT

All the engineers around me at work have countless references at their desks, I can tell you which language they're working in at any one time by which books have been pulled from the shelves. And plenty are even of the "for dummies" or "beginners" persuasion ;)

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Ok so last question (for awhile hopefully).

If your not good at math will you be a bad programmer? I wouldn't say i'm terrible at math but I wouldn't say i'm the best at it either. Is Math a big essential to being good at programming? Thanks in advance.

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Being good at teamwork and communication tends to be at least as important, despite all attempts to the contrary. Having a mathematically oriented view can help with a lot of programming, but much of the time the actual math requirements are no greater than what middle school (age 14) gives you.

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